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Thermal Physics

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Thermal Physics

We’re all naturally familiar with the concept of temperature, but how do we actually define a substance’s temperature using physics? Describing the internal thermal energy of a substance using a temperature turns out to be a fundamental aspect of physics and thermodynamics.

What is temperature?

The thermal energy of a substance is proportional to the (average) kinetic energy of its constituent molecules or atoms. In a system with two objects, the hotter object has a higher temperature and higher average kinetic energy. Thermal energy flows from the hotter object to the colder one until both objects reach the same temperature. This is formalised in the zeroth law of thermodynamics.

The zeroth law of thermodynamics

Although the zeroth law of thermodynamics was only the fourth law to be proposed, it was deemed so fundamental to thermal physics that it now comes first.

Thermal Physics. Zeroth law of thermodynamics. StudySmarterFigure 1. The zeroth law is a fundamental concept of thermal physics that provides a basis for the definition of temperature and mathematical laws about the effects of temperature. Source: Ross MacDonald, StudySmarter.

The zeroth law states:

If two objects A and C are both independently in thermal equilibrium with some third object B, then A and C are also in equilibrium with each other. This also shows all three objects are of equal temperature.

This (seemingly obvious) law defines temperature as a property that describes the direction of any thermal energy transfer between objects. The zeroth law is important as it shows that the transfer of thermal energy is controlled by physical temperatures rather than an object’s total thermal (kinetic) energy.

Temperature scales

Having defined what temperature is, we now need a way to measure it. In order to compare the temperatures of different objects, a scale is needed. A temperature scale is defined by two fixed points at specific temperatures, with a number of increments between them.

There are currently three main temperature scales in use around the world:

Celsius

  • This temperature scale, proposed by Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius in 1742, is used by most of the world.
  • The fixed points used by the Celsius scale are the freezing point (0°C) and the boiling point of water (100°C at atmospheric pressure 1.01⋅105 Pa), with 100 increments of 1°C between them.

Fahrenheit

  • The Fahrenheit scale, proposed by German physicist Daniel Fahrenheit in the 18th century, is primarily used in the United States.
  • The scale is also based on the freezing (32°F) and boiling (212°F) points of water, with 180 increments between them.

Kelvin (absolute temperature)

  • The absolute temperature scale uses the fixed points of the triple point of water (273.16°K) and absolute zero (0°K). These were selected because they do not vary with atmospheric pressure, unlike the Celsius and Fahrenheit scales.
  • When defining the Kelvin scale, it was decided that each increment should be equal to 1°C to make comparisons simpler. This is why there are exactly 273.16°F between the two fixed points.
  • The kelvin is the SI unit of temperature. To convert between temperatures in Celsius and kelvin, we can use the formula T(K)=T(C)+273.16.
  • Temperatures on the kelvin scale are always positive.

The triple point of water (or other substances) is the temperature and pressure at which all three phases of matter (solid, liquid, and gas) can coexist. The different phases also exist in thermal equilibrium, with no net thermal energy transfers between them. For pure water, the triple point is 0.01°C at 611.2 Pa.

Heat transfer

Now that we have an understanding of what temperature is, we can explore how thermal energy (heat) is transferred between objects in a system. This field of physics is known as thermodynamics, which deals with the relationships between heat, work, temperature, and energy in systems.

The laws of thermodynamics

We have already encountered the zeroth law of thermodynamics, which provides the basis for the definition of temperature. Let us now explore the remaining laws of thermodynamics.

The first law of thermodynamics

Q is used to represent the change in thermal energy in the first law of thermodynamics, which states:

A change in internal energy (ΔU) of a system is comprised of the thermal energy added to the system (Q) plus any net gain or loss of energy via work done to or by the system (W).

ΔU=Q-W

This shows that energy cannot be created or destroyed.

The second law of thermodynamics

The second law introduces the property of entropy, represented by S.

When two previously isolated systems are allowed to interact, they will eventually reach a state of thermal equilibrium. The total entropy (S) of the combined system will be greater than the sum of the two isolated systems.

A unit of heat transferred (δQ) is a product of the temperature of the systems (T) and the change in total entropy (∂s).

The third law of thermodynamics

The third law states that, as a system’s temperature approaches absolute zero and all thermal energy is removed, the system reaches a constant ground state. The value of entropy at this point is known as the system residual entropy. If the system only has one possible microstate at absolute zero, then the residual entropy will also be zero. The constant value of a system’s residual entropy at absolute zero increases with the number of possible system microstates.

Here, S is the system residual entropy, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and Ω is the number of microstates.

A pure crystal is an example of a material that would have zero residual entropy, as there is only one valid crystalline structure (microstate) its atoms can adopt.

Internal energy

All substances (solid, liquid, or gas) have internal energy (U), which is the sum of the kinetic energy and potential energy of its constituent molecules. The levels of kinetic and potential energy each individual molecule has are random (within the range of energy contained in the system), but we can understand these properties of the larger substance by using the average energies of its molecules.

The kinetic energy of molecules in a substance is directly related to its temperature, while their potential energy depends on the phase of the substance. The potential energy is made up of electrostatic potential energy. The attractive forces between molecules are ‘stretched’ as the average distance between molecules increases when transitioning from solid to liquid, or liquid to gas. This increases their electrostatic potential energy, just as increasing the distance between an object and the earth raises its gravitational potential energy.

Thermal Physics. Internal energy components. StudySmarterFigure 2. The diagram shows how the kinetic and electrostatic potential components of a substance’s internal energy increase through phase changes as energy is transferred into the substance at a steady rate. Source: Ross MacDonald, StudySmarter.

The diagram shows how energy is transferred into a substance at a steady rate. During phase changes, the kinetic energy of its molecules (temperature) remains constant, while the electrostatic potential energy increases. This is because, during the phase change, the input energy is transferred to an increase in electrostatic potential as the substance melts or evaporates and forces between the molecules change.

Outside of phase changes, the electrostatic potential remains relatively constant, and all the input energy is converted into molecular kinetic energy, increasing the temperature of the substance. The total internal energy is a sum of these two components and increases at the same rate as energy is transferred into the substance.

  • In solids, the electrostatic potential energy is a large negative, as the strong bonds between atoms or molecules require significant energy to be broken.
  • In liquids, the electrostatic forces between molecules are smaller, so the potential is a smaller negative, as less energy is required to break them.
  • In gases, the electrostatic potential is near zero, as the forces between molecules are very weak or negligible.

Latent heat

The contribution of electrostatic potential energy to the total internal energy creates a property known as the specific latent heat of a substance.

Specific latent heat L is defined as the energy required to change a substance’s phase per unit mass while at a constant temperature.

Here, E is the energy required for the phase change, while M is the mass of the substance.

Specific heat

Different substances require varying amounts of thermal energy transfer to change their temperatures by the same amount. Water is an example of a substance with a high specific heat capacity (think of how long it takes to boil water for a cup of tea). This is because a large amount of energy needs to be transferred into the water by the kettle to raise its temperature to 100°C. An example of a low specific heat capacity is iron, and therefore most steels (think of how quickly a steel spoon heats up in the mug of tea you just made).

The specific heat capacity of a substance is calculated as:

change in energy = mass · specific heat capacity · change in temp

Here, ΔE is the change in internal energy, m is the mass of substance, c is the specific heat capacity, and Δθ is the change in heat energy. Specific heat capacity is given in units of J⋅kg-1K-1.

How much energy is required to boil water for a cup of tea? Using a 2000W kettle, how long would this take to boil?

Quantity of water: 0.25kg

Starting temperature: 21°C

Specific heat capacity of water: 4200 J⋅kg-1K-1

Assuming we’re making tea at an altitude near sea level, our target boiling temperature is 100°C. Therefore, the required change in temperature is 79°C.

To determine the change in energy, we now multiply:

The power rating of an appliance in watts tells us how many joules of energy per second it uses. Modelling the kettle as 100% efficient, we can divide to find the time it took to boil:

Ideal gases

We can describe macroscopic properties, such as the mass, temperature, or pressure of gases, relatively easily. However, in order to fully understand how gases behave, we also need to know what’s happening at the level of an individual particle. The number of atoms (or molecules) in a volume of gas is described using a unit called mole, the SI unit for the amount of substance, which indicates the number of atoms or molecules in a given sample of a given substance.

One mole of a substance is a quantity that contains as many elementary entities (atoms or molecules) as there are atoms in 0.012kg of carbon-12. That number of entities is 6.02⋅1023, also known as the Avogadro constant NA.

The Avogadro constant can be used to calculate the number of atoms N in n moles of a substance:

An ideal gas is a theoretical substance whose molecules occupy negligible space and are not affected by electrostatic force interactions. These properties mean it will obey the ideal gas laws exactly.

Thermal Physics - Key takeaways

  • The zeroth law of thermodynamics states that if two objects A and C are both independently in thermal equilibrium with some third object B, then A and C are also in equilibrium with each other.
  • Temperature scales are defined by two fixed points at specific temperatures, with a number of increments between them. The absolute temperature scale uses units of kelvin (°K) that are equal to Celsius (°C), with 0°K at absolute zero (-273.16°C).
  • The internal energy of a substance is comprised of molecular kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy. During phase changes, the temperature and molecular kinetic energy remain constant while electrostatic potential increases. As the temperature of each phase increases, the electrostatic potential remains constant while molecular kinetic energy increases.
  • Moles are the SI unit for the amount of substance that indicates the number of atoms or molecules in a given sample of a given substance.
  • An ideal gas is an approximation of a real gas with certain assumptions that allow its behaviour to be modelled using the ideal gas equation.

Frequently Asked Questions about Thermal Physics

Thermal physics is a subject covering the fields of thermodynamics and the kinetic theory of gases. Statistical mechanics is also used to study these by approximating the behavior of large numbers of particles.

The amount of energy in a substance is its internal energy (U), comprised of thermal energy and electrostatic potential energy. To calculate the amount of thermal energy required for temperature changes the specific heat capacity of materials can be used: Change in energy (E) = mass (m) · specific heat capacity (c) · change in temperature (ΔT).


The term Q represents a change in the thermal energy of a substance. The first law of thermodynamics states: a change in internal energy (ΔU) of a system is comprised of the thermal energy added to the system (Q) plus any net gain or loss of energy via work done to or by the system (W).

Final Thermal Physics Quiz

Question

 What is thermal energy transfer?

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It is the energy being transferred in the form of heat between bodies.

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Which of the following is not a method for thermal energy transfer?

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Absorption

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What is convective heat transfer?

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It is the transfer of thermal energy through a fluid due to movement of the particles.

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What is radiative heat transfer?


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It is thermal energy emitted from heated bodies as EM radiation.

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What is conductive heat transfer?


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It is the transfer of thermal energy through collisions of subatomic particles of a body.

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What is the heat transfer coefficient?


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It is a parameter that defines how well a medium can transfer thermal energy.

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What is the formula for heat transfer?

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It is defined as Q= hA(T2-T1).

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How do we find the heat transfer coefficient?

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By rearranging the above equation h = Q/A(T2-T1).

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Which of the following parameters does not affect the heat transfer coefficient


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Thermal resistance

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Which of the following parameters does not affect heat flow?


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Volume

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Can thermal energy be created from nothing? Yes or no. 


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 No.

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State the conservation of energy theory.


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Energy cannot be created nor destroyed, it can only change form.

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Is thermal conductivity the same as heat transfer coefficient?


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No, the heat transfer coefficient depends on the thermal conductivity.

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Question

Can the following example be described as convective heat transfer? Yes or no. 

'A solid piece of ice is positioned in one’s hand. After a while, the ice melts into liquid.'

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No.

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Is it possible to have convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer simultaneously? Yes or no. 


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Yes.


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Question

What is thermal energy transfer?

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Thermal energy transfer involves the transfer of internal energy or the total amount of kinetic energy and potential energy of all the particles in a system.

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What are the main methods of heat transfer?

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Answer

Convection, conduction, and radiation. 

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What is conduction?

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Conduction is the transfer of thermal energy that is transmitted by collisions between atoms and molecules.

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When does conduction occur?

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It occurs between two objects that have different temperatures and are in contact.

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What is convection?

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Convection is the  transfer of thermal energy  due to movement of heated fluid. 

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When does convection occur?

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When pressure gradient is present in a fluid due to temperature difference.

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What are the two methods of convection?

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Forced and natural convection.

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What is radiation heat transfer?

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It is the transfer of thermal energy in the form of electromagnetic radiation. It is emitted by a heated surface in all directions.

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What is the aim of the conduction heat transfer experiment?

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To investigate the rate of conduction of four different metals.

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What is the systematic errors in the conduction experiment?

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Not allowing rods to cool to room temperature.

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What is the aim of a convection experiment?

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To investigate the rate of convection of potassium permanganate crystals in two different temperatures of water. 

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Which of the following is a random error of the convection experiment?

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Amount of water in the beaker should be exactly the same. 


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What is the aim of the radiation thermal transfer experiment?

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To investigate whether the amount of infrared radiation absorbed by a surface depends on the colour of that surface. 

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Which of the following is not a source of systematic errors in the radiation experiment?

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Using the same amount of hot water.


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What type of graph is required to investigate whether the colour of objects will affect their emitted thermal energy?

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A temperature vs time graph.

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What are models of gas behavior?

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The different gas models that describe the behaviour and structure of gas particles which have evolved over the years.

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Which is the latest and most valid gas model?

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Kinetic theory model.

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Which is the oldest gas model and when was it developed?

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Democritus model, which was developed about 2000 years ago.

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What is the Democritus model? 

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He believed that an object is made out of infinitesimally small uniform indivisible pieces which comprise the atomos.

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Why was the Democritus model rejected, and by whom?

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 Aristotle and Platonas rejected Democritus' idea. They did not believe that empty spaces existed, and they further thought that matter is made out of four main elements: air, fire, water, and earth.

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What is Robert Boyle's model? 


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It states that the pressure of a gas is inversely proportional to the volume of the gas under constant temperature.

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What did Jacques Charles discover?


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He discovered that gases expand in volume when they are heated. 

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What is Bernoulli's principle?


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Bernoulli's principle states that for ideal fluids the pressure and velocity are inversely proportional, and that energy per volume is conserved.

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Why is Bernoulli's principle so important? 


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Bernoulli's principle was the beginning of the kinetic theory, which is now the most acceptable gas theory.

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What is Brownian motion?

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Any physical quantity submerged in a fluid is undergoing random fluctuations. 

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What is the Maxwell distribution?

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It is the first statistical law in physics that predicts the range speed of a proportion of particle in ideal gases.

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What is the Kinetic model?

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It stated that the molecules are in constant, random motion and frequently collide with each other and the walls of their container.

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What did Albert Einstein discover which is relevant to Brownian motion?

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Pollen particles were displaced by the individual water molecules causing random movement of particles submerged in a fluid. He predicted the exact displacement of the pollen particles.

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What did Einstein's discovery lead to ?

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The validation of the existence of the atom and the development of the atomic theory. 

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Choose the correct answer.

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Thermodynamics is the statistical study of many-particle systems.

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Choose the correct answer.

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Temperature, pressure, and volume are enough for giving a complete description of a thermodynamic system.

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Choose the correct answer.

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The three laws of ideal gases can be derived from the combined law for ideal gases.

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Choose the correct answer.

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Pressure and temperature are intensive quantities and volume is an extensive quantity.

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Choose the correct answer.

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The laws of ideal gases are valid if the amount of substance is kept constant.

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Are thermodynamic quantities statistical properties of the system?

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Yes, thermodynamic quantities are statistical properties of the system.

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