Arrows Impossibility Theorem

Delve into the fascinating world of Microeconomics as you uncover the key facets of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem. This Nobel-prize-winning theory, often seen as a cornerstone in understanding how decisions are made in a group, forms the bedrock of many economic models. The article elucidates the detailed definition, assumptions, practical applications, as well as an in-depth evaluation of this revolutionary theorem. It further explores how Arrow's Theorem significantly influences the social welfare function and the overall field of Microeconomics.

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What is the Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem?

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What is a social welfare function?

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What are the assumptions of Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem?

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What do we mean by unanimity in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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What are Arrow's requirements for a social welfare function?

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The Impossibility Theorem or Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem suggests that under certain conditions, reaching a common good while considering individual preferences through a social welfare function is not possible.

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What do we mean by independence of irrelevant alternatives in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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What does non-dictatorship as a condition imply in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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Which one of the following is not an assumption of the Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem?

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What do we mean by unrestricted domain in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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According to the Arrow's Theorem a voting system must either be logical and complete with a dictator, or it shouldn’t be logical and complete at all.

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  • Mo

What is the Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem?

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  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What is a social welfare function?

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  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the assumptions of Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem?

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  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What do we mean by unanimity in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are Arrow's requirements for a social welfare function?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

The Impossibility Theorem or Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem suggests that under certain conditions, reaching a common good while considering individual preferences through a social welfare function is not possible.

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What do we mean by independence of irrelevant alternatives in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What does non-dictatorship as a condition imply in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

Which one of the following is not an assumption of the Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem?

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  • Mo

What do we mean by unrestricted domain in Arrow's Impossibility Theorem?

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According to the Arrow's Theorem a voting system must either be logical and complete with a dictator, or it shouldn’t be logical and complete at all.

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Table of contents

    Understanding Arrow's Impossibility Theorem

    When you delve into the field of microeconomics, one of the intriguing theories you come across is Arrow's Impossibility Theorem. Introduced by Nobel laureate Kenneth Arrow, this theorem presents a fundamental paradox in voting systems and preference aggregation. Let's engage in understanding this fascinating concept along with its definition, associated key terms, and outlined assumptions.

    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem Definition

    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem states that it proves being impossible to convert public preferences into a satisfactory social choice, under certain stipulated conditions - all through an adequately defined voting process. It critically appraises collective decision-making procedures by comparing individual preferences.

    The crux of the theorem lies in its contention that no voting system can convert the ranking of individual preferences into a community-wide ranking while also meeting a predefined set of fair criteria. This further signifies the inherent limitations within a voting procedure, shedding light on the complexities associated with group decision-making in economics, political science and related fields.

    Key terms related to Arrow's Impossibility Theorem

    Exploring Arrow's Impossibility theorem involves encountering vital terms such as:

    • Preference aggregation: It is the process of combining individual preferences to derive a collective preference order.
    • Social choice theory: A framework for understanding collective decision processes, which considers individual preferences, fairness, and social welfare.
    • Voting paradoxes: These are situations where collective preferences are inconsistent or cyclical - even when individual preferences are not.

    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem Assumptions

    In Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, certain assumptions critically guide the exploration of collective decision-making processes. Let's gain an understanding of these.

    Non-dictatorship No single individual can dictate the group's choice. Pareto efficiency If everyone prefers a certain option, it should be the collective choice. Independence of irrelevant alternatives The group's preference between X and Y depends only on individual preferences between X and Y

    Major considerations within the Arrow's Impossibility Theorem

    When applying arrow's theorem, you must consider its implications in practical scenarios. For instance, consider the limitations it highlights in voting systems for political elections, decision-making bodies, or even determining economic policies. It brings significant insight into the strategies and the system functionality, serving as an essential theoretical tool for microeconomics.

    A practical assumption within Arrow's Impossibility Theorem is the Pareto principle, where if every individual in a group prefers option A over option B, then the Group Preference should also favour option A over B. However, in scenarios attributing equal votes to both A and B options, a resolution mechanism is required – proving to be a considerable challenge given the theorem's constraints.

    Therefore, it becomes essential to understand Arrow's Impossibility Theorem when analysing decision-making processes in microeconomic environments. It helps you recognise the constraints present in real-world situations, often providing an explanation for seemingly irrational outcomes. Always remember, economics as a science often unveils the complex textures within apparently simple processes.

    Practical Applications of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem

    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem holds fundamental implications, not just for theoretical discussions but also tangible applications in the real world. This theorem broadly resonates within decision-making processes, significantly influencing voting systems, collective preference formations, and governance mechanisms, highlighting the powerful analytical capacity of microeconomics.

    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem Example

    Now, you might wonder how the Arrow's Impossibility theorem applies in daily life or business scenarios. To understand it better, let's delve into an illustrative example.

    Imagine a reading club with three members Alice, Bob and Charlie. They have to collectively decide from a preference list of three books - X, Y and Z. Alice prefers X to Y and Y to Z (notated as X>Y>Z). Bob has a preference ranking of Y>Z>X, while Charlie prefers Z>X>Y. Aggregating their individual preferences to form a collective one could lead to a circular preference: X is preferred over Y (according to Alice), Y is preferred over Z (according to Bob), and Z is preferred over X (according to Charlie). This situation, a voting paradox, points at Arrow's Impossibility Theorem in action.

    Analysing an Arrow's Impossibility Theorem's example

    Using Arrow's theorem in the reading club scenario outlines the inherent challenges in forming a collective preference that is simultaneously fair, democratic, and rational. A simple alteration in any one person's preference can change the group's overall preference, displaying a violation of the Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives. This intricate interplay between individual and collective preferences brings out the essence of Arrow's theorem.

    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem and Social Welfare Function

    Arrow's Impossibility theorem extensively influences our understanding of the Social Welfare function, a significant concept in welfare economics. Here is where, the critical interaction between individual and society, as guided by microeconomic principles, takes centre stage.

    The Social Welfare Function is a real-valued function that combines individual utilities to generate a measure of social welfare. Essentially, it constitutes the societal preference order based on the individual's preferences, acting as an umbrella representation of the entire community's wellbeing.

    How Arrow's theorem influences social welfare

    Arrow's theorem substantially shapes our perception of the Social Welfare Function, exemplifying inherent limitations in achieving a collectively preferred order from individual preferences without breaching fairness rules.

    For instance, consider a society deciding on income distribution. Even when personal preferences are consistent and transitive, the societal preference (ensemble of individual preferences) may be cyclic or intransitive, as indicated by Arrow's theorem. This complexity in preference aggregation can hold significant implications for determining social welfare. Moreover, any policy intervention aimed at achieving a 'fair' and 'optimal' resource distribution must contend with the constraints underscored by Arrow's theory - illustrating the theorem's far-reaching significance.

    Evaluating Arrow's Impossibility Theorem

    After understanding the core concept and applications of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, it's crucial to delve deeper into its proof and implications. Exploring the proof helps grasp the mathematical rigor underlying the theory, while knowledge of its implications gives us an insight into the theorem's profound influence on the world of microeconomics.

    Arrows Impossibility Theorem Proof

    You might now be curious to understand how this remarkable theorem is proven. Let's delve into the theorem's proof, its intricate steps and the logical reasoning underpinning it.

    Arrow's theorem is proven using a method of contradiction. The proof assumes that there exists a social decision-making rule (a Social Welfare Function) that meets all the conditions defined by Arrow (Non-dictatorship, Unrestricted Domain, Pareto Efficiency, and Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives). Moving forward, it conclusively shows that this leads to a contradiction, thereby proving that no such social decision rule can exist.

    Breaking down the proof of Arrow's theorem

    Let's examine the proof step-by-step to gain a comprehensive understanding.

    The proof commences with the assumption that a Social Welfare Function (SWF) exists, which meets all the four criteria. Consider a community with a preference ordering.

    Next, assume that there is another preference profile for the community, wherein a single individual changes their ranking of two options, while all else remains the same. If the SWF is compliant with the Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives, the societal ranking of the two options would remain unaltered.

    Apply this reasoning with additional preference changes, and a situation arises where a single individual's preference change leads to a change in the societal preference order, contradicting the non-dictatorship condition. Hence, the initial assumption of a Social Welfare Function meeting all four criteria is false, thus proving Arrow's Impossibility Theorem.

    Arrows Impossibility Theorem Implications

    With the theorem and its proof outlined, the next task is to understand its implications. Let's explore how Arrow's Impossibility Theorem moulds the terrain of microeconomics.

    The implications of Arrow's theorem are far-reaching. By demonstrating the inherent limitations within the process of preference aggregation, the theorem significantly impacts various areas of economics. It casts doubt on the potential for creating societal preferences that are both fair and rational. Moreover, it warns against any simplistic understanding of collective decision-making, underlining the subtle complexities involved. Its influence, therefore, profoundly shapes the study of voting systems, welfare economics, and social choice theory.

    The impact of this theorem on the field of Microeconomics

    In the realm of microeconomics, Arrow's theorem sets a fundamental cornerstone - infusing the field with a nuanced awareness of collective preferences and the inherent paradoxes therein. It throws light on the complexities within systems involved in translating individual preferences into collective decisions - a theme recurrently visited across microeconomic theories.

    This deep-seated understanding of preferences is essential for studying market mechanisms, formulating economic policies, and exploring rational choice theory, making the theorem indispensable for any economic analysis involving collective decisions. By continually reminding us of this 'impossibility', Arrow's theorem encourages economists to acknowledge these complexities and devise innovative approaches addressing them.

    Arrows Impossibility Theorem - Key takeaways

    • Arrow's Impossibility Theorem was introduced by Nobel laureate Kenneth Arrow as a revolutionary theory in Microeconomics, posing a fundamental paradox in voting systems and preference aggregation.
    • The theorem critically evaluates collective decision-making procedures by comparing individual preferences and contends that no voting system can convert individual ranking preferences into a community-wide ranking while also meeting a predefined set of fair criteria.
    • Major assumptions of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem include non-dictatorship (no single individual dictates the group's choice), Pareto efficiency (if everyone prefers a certain option, it should be the collective choice), and the independence of irrelevant alternatives (the group's preference between X and Y depends only on individual preferences between X and Y).
    • Arrow's Impossibility Theorem significantly influences the concept of the social welfare function in welfare economics. The social welfare function is a real-valued function that combines individual utilities to generate a measure of social welfare.
    • Arrow's Impossibility Theorem is proven using a method of contradiction and has far-reaching implications in various areas of economics such as voting systems, welfare economics, and social choice theory. It encourages economists to acknowledge the complexities in converting individual preferences into collective decisions and devise innovative approaches to address these complexities.
    Frequently Asked Questions about Arrows Impossibility Theorem
    What implications does Arrow's Impossibility Theorem have on democratic decision-making?
    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem poses a challenge to democratic decision-making by suggesting that it's impossible to create a fair voting system that truly honours individual preferences. The theorem demonstrates that no rank-order voting method is completely fair, invariably leading to situations of potential injustice or irrational collective decisions.
    How does Arrow's Impossibility Theorem affect the functionality of a voting system?
    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem suggests that it's impossible to design a voting system that is completely fair and satisfies all voters. The theorem notes that no voting system can convert the ranked preferences of individuals into a collective ranking without violating some criteria of fairness.
    What fundamental principles underlie Arrow's Impossibility Theorem in the context of social welfare functions?
    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem is based on the principles of collective decision making. It argues stringently for: unrestricted domain (any individual preferences are allowed), non-dictatorship (no single voter should decide outcomes), Pareto efficiency (if everyone prefers A to B, so should society) and independence of irrelevant alternatives (society's preference between A & B should not be affected by a change in preferences about C).
    Can Arrow's Impossibility Theorem apply to economic systems beyond just voting, and if so, how?
    Yes, Arrow's Impossibility Theorem can apply beyond voting systems. It has implications for any decision-making process where individual preferences are aggregated into a collective preference, such as market mechanisms, resource allocation and social choice processes in economic systems.
    What is the significance of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem in collective decision-making processes?
    Arrow's Impossibility Theorem is significant in collective decision-making processes as it demonstrates that no voting system can perfectly match individual preferences to a collective preference without violating certain conditions, such as non-dictatorship, unanimity, independence of irrelevant alternatives and transitivity.

    Test your knowledge with multiple choice flashcards

    The Impossibility Theorem or Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem suggests that under certain conditions, reaching a common good while considering individual preferences through a social welfare function is not possible.

    Which one of the following is not an assumption of the Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem?

    According to the Arrow's Theorem a voting system must either be logical and complete with a dictator, or it shouldn’t be logical and complete at all.

    Next

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