Monosyllabic Rhyme

Mono means 'one', so monosyllabic words are words that have only one syllable or sound unit. Examples of monosyllabic words include 'cat,' 'dog,' 'book,' 'tree,' and 'sun.' With this in mind, what is the likely definition of monosyllabic rhyme?

Monosyllabic Rhyme Monosyllabic Rhyme

Create learning materials about Monosyllabic Rhyme with our free learning app!

  • Instand access to millions of learning materials
  • Flashcards, notes, mock-exams and more
  • Everything you need to ace your exams
Create a free account
Table of contents

    Monosyllabic Rhyme, Illustration of the number 1 one a winning stand, StudySmarterFig. 1 - Monosyllabic means one syllable

    Monosyllabic rhyme: definition

    The definition of monosyllabic rhyme is the repetition of identical sounds in single-syllable words. Single-syllable words are also known as monosyllabic words. A basic example of rhyming between monosyllabic words would be door and more, hit and sit, cat and mat, etc.

    Monosyllabic rhyme: syllabic rhyme examples

    It is important to distinguish between monosyllabic rhyme, multisyllabic rhyme, and syllabic rhyme.

    Syllabic rhyme is the rhyming of the last syllable of words. It is when the sound in the last syllable of word pairs is the same but does not contain stressed vowels.

    • An example of Syllabic rhyme is pitter and patter.

    Monosyllabic rhyme is the rhyming of single-syllable words.

    • An example of Monosyllabic rhyme is hit and sit.

    Multisyllabic rhyme is the rhyming of multiple syllables. This can be with multisyllabic words, or rhyming multiple monosyllabic words with other monosyllabic words:

    • An example of Multisyllabic rhyme is gratitude (gr-ah-tih-chew-d) and latitude (l-ah-tih-chew-d), (rhyming multisyllabic words).

    • Another example of multisyllabic rhyme is no way and snow day, (rhyming multiple monosyllabic words).

    Examples of monosyllabic rhyme

    There are multiple examples of monosyllabic rhymes that are found in other different types of rhymes.

    Masculine Rhyme

    Masculine Rhyme is a technique that places stress on the final syllable of a rhyme. It is the best example of the use of monosyllabic rhyme. Masculine rhyme uses monosyllabic rhymes frequently to rhyme a single syllable at the end of one line with a single syllable at the end of another line.

    Take this example in Patience Agbabi's 'The Black, the White and the Blue' (1995):

    He's an East End lad, East End Ed

    East End born, East End bred

    See his muscles, have a feel

    Made in England, made of steel

    He's an East End lad, East End Ed

    East End born, East End bred

    See his muscles, have a feel

    Made in England, made of steel

    Each line ends with a single-syllable word - these single-syllable rhymes are a clear example of monosyllabic rhyme.

    The use of monosyllabic rhyme reinforces and draws the reader's attention to the blunt, sharp staccato-rhythm of the poem. This is important because this poem uses masculine rhyme to describe a stereotypical macho hooligan; the rhyme scheme mirrors the blunt, brutish nature of the character.

    Monosyllabic rhyme: Shakespearean examples

    Monosyllabic Rhyme, Portrait of William Shakespeare, StudySmarterFig. 2 - William Shakespeare often used monosyllabic rhyme in his works.

    In Shakespeare's works, multisyllabic words are often shortened for the purpose of creating monosyllabic rhyme.

    His use of iambic pentameter (ten-syllable lines) means there are numerous occasions in which words such as 'even' are shortened to the monosyllabic 'e'en' in order to fit the meter and rhythm of the poem.

    An example of a shortened multisyllabic word can be seen in this internal monosyllabic rhyme from Romeo and Juliet (1597):

    The game was ne'er so fair. (Act 1, Scene 4, Line 41)

    'Never', which should contain two syllables (ne-ver) has been shortened to the monosyllabic 'ne'er' (pronounced na-ir) in order to rhyme with 'fair', which is a monosyllabic word.

    Monosyllabic rhyme - Love Labor's Lost

    Another example of monosyllabic rhyming in Shakespeare can be found in an excerpt from Love's Labor's Lost (1598) (Act IV Scene 3). See if you can spot the different types of rhyme present in this poem:

    On a day, alack the day!

    Love, whose month is ever May,

    Spied a blossom passing fair

    Playing in the wanton air.

    Through the velvet leaves the wind,

    All unseen, can passage find;

    That the lover, sick to death,

    Wish'd himself the heaven's breath.

    Monosyllabic rhyme is easy to spot. Day-May, fair-air and death-breath are all rhymes between single-syllable words.

    Masculine rhyme is another rhyming technique that is easily noticeable in this poem. Note how the final syllable of every line is stressed - the rhyme between each final syllable serves to place emphasis on these words and highlight their significance in relation to the main theme of the poem, which is love.

    End rhyme is the rhyming of words at the end of each line, as can be seen in this poem.

    Eye rhyme is another rhyme technique in the poem. 'Wind' and 'Find', while having identical -ind endings, are pronounced differently (w-ih-nd and fy-nd) and thus are eye rhymes.

    Monosyllabic Rhyme, Illustration of a white heart in a pink talking bubble, StudySmarterFig. 3 - Shakespeare's Love Labor's Lost makes use of varying types of rhyme.

    Monosyllabic rhyme is intentional in this poem. Consider the use of multi-syllabic words that are littered throughout the beginning and middle of each line - blossom, passing, playing, wanton, velvet etc. The lilting effect of multisyllabic words echoes the flowery sentiments of love being expressed by Shakespeare. This use of multisyllabic words is then contrasted with the simple, staccato-like sounds of the monosyllabic words.

    Consider what effect ending each line with a monosyllabic rhyme has on the flow and rhythm of the poem. Does it indicate to the reader how Shakespeare intended the rhythm to sound?

    Monosyllabic Rhyme vs. Monorhyme

    Monosyllabic rhyme is not to be confused with Monorhyme (a rhyme scheme that uses a singular rhyme throughout the whole poem, such as AAAA). Given the closeness in names, it is easy to see why these two techniques are often confused.

    Distinguishing between monosyllabic rhyme and monorhyme is easy - monosyllabic rhyme is when one-syllable words are rhymed, while monorhyme is when there is a singular rhyme throughout the poem between words.

    '7 Years' (2015) by Lukas Graham contains monorhyme:

    It was a big big world but we thought we were bigger

    Pushing eachother to the limits we were learning quicker

    By eleven smoking herb and drinking burning liquor

    Never rich so we were out to make that steady figure

    This is an example of monorhyme, but 'bigger', 'quicker', 'liquor', and 'figure' are all multisyllabic words - two-syllable words to be exact. This distinguishes monorhyme from monosyllabic rhyme, which uses monosyllabic words.

    There are also examples of poems with monorhyme using monosyllabic rhymes. For example, 'Upon Julia's clothes' by Robert Herrick (1648):

    Whenas in silks my Julia goes,

    Then, then, methinks, how sweetly flows

    The liquefaction of her clothes!

    Next, when I cast mine eyes and see

    That brave vibration each way free,

    - O how that glittering taketh me!

    Here, monosyllabic words are being rhymed to maintain the monorhyme. The use of monorhyme and monosyllabic end rhymes reflects the simplicity of the central theme of the poem, which is the speaker's admiration for Julia and how she wears her clothes.

    Monosyllabic Rhyme - Key Takeaways

    • Monosyllabic rhyme is the repetition of identical sounds in single-syllable words (which are also known as monosyllabic words). It is often used in Masculine Rhyme.

    • Syllabic rhyme is the rhyming of the last syllable of words.

    • Multisyllabic rhyme is the rhyming of multiple syllables. This can be multisyllabic words, or rhyming multiple monosyllabic words with other monosyllabic words.

    • Multisyllabic words can be shortened for the purpose of creating monosyllabic rhyme.

    • Monosyllabic rhyme is 'one syllable' rhyme in which one-syllable words are rhymed, while monorhyme is 'one rhyme' in which there is a singular rhyme between similar words.


    References

    1. Fig. 1 - Image by starline on Freepik
    2. Fig. 3 - Image by mamemwy on Freepik
    Frequently Asked Questions about Monosyllabic Rhyme

    What is syllabic rhyme?

    Syllabic Rhyme is the rhyming of the last syllable of words e.g ‘pitter and patter’.

    What is a syllabic verse in poetry?

    A syllabic verse in a poem is one that has a set number of syllables per line which create the rhythm and pace of the poem.

    What is a syllable rhyme called?

    A syllabic rhyme means that the last syllable of words rhyme. This is also sometimes called end rhyme or tail rhyme.

    What is a one syllable rhyme?

    When one-syllable words rhyme, it is called monosyllabic. Monosyllabic rhyme then uses monosyllabic words.

    Test your knowledge with multiple choice flashcards

    Which of these is an example of monosyllabic rhyme?

    Which of the following techniques particularly uses monosyllabic rhyme?

    Sandy describes a technique used by Shakespeare in one of his poem’s whereby he rhymes the last syllable of each word with one another. Which two techniques could she be referring to?

    Next

    Discover learning materials with the free StudySmarter app

    Sign up for free
    1
    About StudySmarter

    StudySmarter is a globally recognized educational technology company, offering a holistic learning platform designed for students of all ages and educational levels. Our platform provides learning support for a wide range of subjects, including STEM, Social Sciences, and Languages and also helps students to successfully master various tests and exams worldwide, such as GCSE, A Level, SAT, ACT, Abitur, and more. We offer an extensive library of learning materials, including interactive flashcards, comprehensive textbook solutions, and detailed explanations. The cutting-edge technology and tools we provide help students create their own learning materials. StudySmarter’s content is not only expert-verified but also regularly updated to ensure accuracy and relevance.

    Learn more
    StudySmarter Editorial Team

    Team Monosyllabic Rhyme Teachers

    • 7 minutes reading time
    • Checked by StudySmarter Editorial Team
    Save Explanation

    Study anywhere. Anytime.Across all devices.

    Sign-up for free

    Sign up to highlight and take notes. It’s 100% free.

    Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App

    The first learning app that truly has everything you need to ace your exams in one place

    • Flashcards & Quizzes
    • AI Study Assistant
    • Study Planner
    • Mock-Exams
    • Smart Note-Taking
    Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App