World Health Organization Mental Health

Dive into the intricate aspects of the World Health Organization Mental Health framework and its significance in the field of nursing. In this comprehensive coverage, powerful insights are provided on everything from the core structure and objectives of the WHO Mental Health Action Plan to the worldwide prevalence of mental health disorders. By this exploration, understanding the critical role the World Health Organization plays in shaping mental health nursing and how this, in turn, impacts care delivery will be a valuable takeaway. The contribution of WHO's mental health initiatives to nursing practice is a focal point of this enlightening delve into mental health in the global sphere.

Get started Sign up for free
World Health Organization Mental Health World Health Organization Mental Health

Create learning materials about World Health Organization Mental Health with our free learning app!

  • Instand access to millions of learning materials
  • Flashcards, notes, mock-exams and more
  • Everything you need to ace your exams
Create a free account

Millions of flashcards designed to help you ace your studies

Sign up for free
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What roles does the World Health Organization play in supporting mental health in nursing?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are some key mental health initiatives by the World Health Organization (WHO)?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the four objectives of the World Health Organization's Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

How does the World Health Organization define mental health?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the implications of WHO mental health statistics in the field of nursing?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the characteristics of mental illnesses according to the World Health Organization (WHO)?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the key highlights of WHO's Mental Health Action Plan for nurses?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

How do WHO's mental health initiatives impact mental health nursing?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

How does the World Health Organization (WHO) describe the role of nurses in managing mental illness?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What is the method used by the World Health Organization for categorising mental health disorders?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What is the definition of mental health statistics according to the World Health Organization (WHO)?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What roles does the World Health Organization play in supporting mental health in nursing?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are some key mental health initiatives by the World Health Organization (WHO)?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the four objectives of the World Health Organization's Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

How does the World Health Organization define mental health?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the implications of WHO mental health statistics in the field of nursing?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the characteristics of mental illnesses according to the World Health Organization (WHO)?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What are the key highlights of WHO's Mental Health Action Plan for nurses?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

How do WHO's mental health initiatives impact mental health nursing?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

How does the World Health Organization (WHO) describe the role of nurses in managing mental illness?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What is the method used by the World Health Organization for categorising mental health disorders?

Show Answer
  • + Add tag
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Mo

What is the definition of mental health statistics according to the World Health Organization (WHO)?

Show Answer

Convert documents into flashcards for free with AI!

Contents
Table of contents

    Understanding the World Health Organization Mental Health Framework

    The field of nursing is not only about physical health, but also involves a crucial focus on mental health. A key role in global mental health is played by the World Health Organization (WHO). This article will delve into understanding the WHO's groundwork and approach to mental health.

    What is the World Health Organization Mental Health?

    The World Health Organization is a global entity that sets the standards for health, including mental health, across the globe. It leads global efforts to combat diseases and promotes the overall health of people. The WHO's perspective on mental health is broad and comprehensive, encapsulating more than just the absence of mental illnesses or disorders.

    The World Health Organization defines mental health as a state of well-being in which an individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively, and is able to contribute to his or her community.

    The Importance of the World Health Organization's Work on Mental Health

    The WHO's work on mental health is pivotal for numerous reasons:

    • Building awareness and understanding: The WHO provides resources and campaigns on a global scale to increase understanding and reduce stigma associated with mental health.
    • Policy Development: The WHO guides nations in framing policies and strategies which are effective, inclusive, and human rights-oriented. By building capacities at a country level, it ensures that mental health services can be scaled up in the right manner.
    • Research and reporting: By tracking progress at a global level and publishing reports, the WHO holds nations accountable and underlines the importance of mental health.

    Structure and Core Objectives of the WHO Mental Health Action Plan

    The World Health Organization formulated the Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 to provide a direction to mental health care worldwide. It revolves around four major objectives:

    Objective 1: To strengthen effective leadership and governance of mental health.
    Objective 2: To provide comprehensive, integrated mental health and social care services in community-based settings.
    Objective 3: To implement strategies for promotion and prevention in mental health.
    Objective 4: To strengthen information systems, evidence and research for mental health.

    For instance, under the objective of promoting mental health, the WHO encourages countries to develop and implement strategies to promote mental well-being, prevent mental disorders, provide early identification and management, and ensure that recovery-oriented services are accessible to all people with mental disorders.

    The Action Plan plays a crucial role by catalysing changes at the country level. It envisions a future where mental health is valued, promoted, and protected, where mental health care is accessible, and where people with mental health conditions can live fulfilling lives, free of stigma and discrimination.

    Exploring Mental health disorders according to WHO

    The World Health Organization's perspective on mental health extends to a thorough and nuanced understanding of mental health disorders. Known for their rigorous and comprehensive classifications, the WHO provides insightful guidance for comprehending and addressing various mental health disorders.

    Overview: Mental Health Disorders as Defined by the WHO

    According to the World Health Organization, mental health disorders comprise a broad range of problems, with different symptoms. They are generally characterized by some combination of abnormal thoughts, emotions, behaviour, and relationships with others. Examples include schizophrenia, depression, intellectual disabilities, and disorders due to drug use.

    The World Health Organization defines mental disorders as disturbances in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behaviour that mirror a dysfunction in the psychological, biological, or developmental processes underlying mental function. Such disorders can be extremely distressing and can often result in disability.

    It's crucial to understand that mental health disorders can exist on a broad spectrum of severity. Many people have mental health concerns from time to time. However, a mental health concern morphs into a mental health disorder when ongoing signs and symptoms cause frequent stress and affect one's ability to function.

    For example, a person might feel worried or anxious about a personal conflict or an upcoming exam. These feelings may be unpleasant, but they usually dissipate once the event passes. However, if these feelings of anxiety persist long after the trigger is gone, and interferes with the person's life, work, and relationships, it may warrant a diagnosis of a generalized anxiety disorder.

    Worldwide Prevalence of Mental Health Disorders: WHO Reporting

    The global prevalence of mental health disorders is wide-ranging and varied. However, available evidence from the World Health Organization estimate that nearly one in four people worldwide is affected by a mental disorder at some point in their lives.

    • Depression affects more than 264 million people.
    • Dementia affects about 50 million people, with 10 million new cases every year.
    • Autism spectrum disorders affect 1 in 160 children.
    • Substance use disorders, including drug and alcohol use disorders, affect more than 20 million people.

    These numbers underscore that mental disorders are among the leading causes of ill-health and disability worldwide. Such disorders can have severe impacts on people's functioning and quality of life, as well as on the communities in which they live.

    How WHO Categorises Mental Health Disorders

    The World Health Organization takes a classification approach to mental disorders. This is documented in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), currently in its 11th revision.

    ICD-11 is a classification system produced by the World Health Organization that provides a comprehensive listing of diseases and other health conditions, including mental health disorders. This system aids in the comparison and sharing of health information between hospitals, regions, and countries.

    The ICD-11 organises mental disorders into several categories, each with their own set of diagnostic criteria, including:

    Mood disorders: This category includes depressive, bi-polar, and related disorders.
    Anxiety and Fear-related disorders: This includes generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and phobias.
    Obsessive-compulsive and related disorders: As the name suggests, this covers conditions like obsessive-compulsive disorder.
    Disorders due to addictive behaviours:This category encompasses substance abuse disorders and non-substance addictive behaviours, like gambling.

    An individual diagnosed with major depression, for instance, will be categorised based on specific criteria being met, such as a significant decrease in interest or pleasure in activities, significant weight loss or gain, or difficulties with sleeping or concentration.

    This categorisation helps health care professionals diagnose, treat, and manage mental disorders. Additionally, it assists governments and health services providers to plan and allocate resources effectively.

    Analysing Mental Health Statistics by WHO

    Insightful examination of statistics provides powerful evidence for understanding mental health on a global scale. The World Health Organization regularly publishes these figures, detailing the prevalence, burden, and treatment of mental health disorders. Armed with this data, professionals in the nursing field can better comprehend, strategize and respond to mental health needs around the world.

    Overview: Mental Health Statistics According to the WHO

    Every year, the World Health Organization releases an updated compilation of key statistics related to mental health. These statistics provide a snapshot of the current state of mental health and associated services globally.

    According to the World Health Organization, mental health statistics are data that quantitatively describe aspects of mental health, such as prevalence of various mental disorders, rates of treatment, and number of individuals affected by each disorder.

    Here are a few noteworthy figures to consider:

    • Nearly 1 billion people are affected by mental disorders globally.
    • 3 million people die every year from the harmful use of alcohol.
    • 1 in 5 children and adolescents has a mental disorder.
    • About 50% of mental health disorders appear by the age of 14, and 75% by mid-twenties.

    For instance, if you look at data from the WHO shared above, you can understand how common mental disorders are globally. The fact that one in five youths has a mental disorder is a strong call to action. This necessitates greater efforts towards early intervention and prevention strategies, particularly as half of these disorders begin appearing by adolescence.

    Trends and Developments in WHO Mental Health Statistics

    Tracking trends in mental health statistics can reveal shifts and patterns over time. It can highlight increasing prevalence, reveal underserved populations, and indicate potential areas of concern for healthcare policy.

    Some key patterns and trends include:

    • Depression and anxiety have increased by nearly 50% between 1990 and 2013, according to the WHO.
    • Eating disorders have more than doubled in recent decades.
    • The prevalence of mental disorders is highest in high-income countries, but the burden is often heavier in low to middle income countries due to lack of mental health service.

    If we take the increasing trend of anxiety and depression worldwide, it indicates a considerable change in mental health patterns over the years. This trend might be linked with evolving societal factors like increased stressors or shifts in societal structure and lifestyle. These insights allow healthcare professionals to anticipate and address the growing demand for support services for these conditions.

    Understanding the Implication of WHO Mental Health Statistics in Nursing

    Nurses play a significant role in mental health care, so it's vital for them to understand and utilise mental health statistics. Through better understanding of these figures, nurses can enhance their practice, inform their decision-making, and advocate for their patients and populations.

    • Recognising prevalence: Understanding the prevalence of mental health disorders can help nurses anticipate the potential needs of their patients.
    • Resource allocation: Statistics related to the treatment gap can assist in lobbying for increased funding and resources.
    • Continuing education: Nurses can use these statistics to identify areas of ongoing educational needs.

    Mental health statistics provide an evidence-based platform for nurses and other healthcare professionals to advocate for mental health on both an individual patient level and a broader societal scale. As crucial frontline care providers, nurses can use these statistics to challenge stigma, improve care, and promote mental well-being in their communities.

    Underpinning nursing practice with data-driven insights creates a stronger approach to mental health care. By embracing statistics as a valuable tool, nurses can continue to push the boundaries in mental health, striving for the best outcomes for patients and communities alike.

    Understanding Mental Illness Definition by WHO

    World Health Organization's varied definitions and classifications of mental illnesses reflect its commitment to comprehensive mental health understanding. With clear, concise definitions, the WHO provides a universal language for health professionals across the globe, aiding in diagnosis, research, and treatment planning.

    Definitions: Common Mental Illnesses According to WHO

    The World Health Organization has laid out definitions for several mental illnesses. These definitions are important for healthcare providers, including nurses, to accurately diagnose and treat these conditions.

    According to WHO, mental illnesses are characterised by a combination of abnormal thoughts, perceptions, emotions, behaviour and relationships with others. Mental illnesses can be associated with significant distress and impairment of functioning.

    Some common mental illness definitions as stated by the WHO are as follows:

    Depression: A common mental disorder characterised by persistent sadness, loss of interest in activities, decreased energy, feelings of guilt or low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite, and poor concentration.
    Bipolar Affective Disorder: Characterised by episodes in which the person’s mood and activity levels are significantly disturbed, this disturbance consists on some occasions of an elevation of mood and increased energy and activity (mania or hypomania), and on others of a lowering of mood and decreased energy and activity (depression).
    Schizophrenia: A chronic mental disorder characterised by distortions in thinking, perception, emotions, language, sense of self and behaviour.
    Dementia:A syndrome due to disease of the brain, usually of a chronic or progressive nature, in which there is disturbance of multiple higher cortical functions, including memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language, and judgement.

    For instance, a person displaying persistent sadness, a lack of interest in activities they used to enjoy, and experiencing difficulties with sleeping might be dealing with depression, according to the WHO's definition. Recognising these symptoms can guide healthcare professionals in providing suitable care and treatment.

    Impact of Mental Illnesses: A WHO Perspective

    The impact of mental illnesses is profound, affecting individuals, their families, and society at large. The World Health Organization acknowledges this impact, examining it in terms of both health outcomes and socio-economic factors.

    According to WHO, mental illnesses can reduce people's ability to carry out essential aspects of daily life, such as self-care, household management, and interpersonal relationships. They may also result in lost educational and employment opportunities, which can have long-term economic impacts. Mental illnesses also bring about health risks, making affected individuals more susceptible to physical health problems.

    • Life Expectancy: WHO reports that people with severe mental illnesses tend to have shorter lifespans. This is often due to physical health problems and illnesses that go unnoticed and untreated.
    • Disability: Mental illnesses are among the leading causes of disability worldwide, according to the WHO.
    • Quality of Life: Mental illnesses can severely affect a person's quality of life, impacting their happiness, relationships, and ability to complete everyday tasks.

    As an example, consider a young person experiencing symptoms of a severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The impact of their condition could lead to them withdrawing from education, which subsequently hinders employment prospects. The impact of the mental illness extends from individual distress to societal economic strain.

    The Role of Nurses in Managing Mental Illness: WHO Guidelines

    In the broad spectrum of mental health care, nurses play an invaluable role. From prevention to early intervention, ongoing management, and recovery, nurses are at the forefront in the battle against mental illness. The WHO has accordingly provided guidelines explicating the role of nurses in managing mental illness.

    According to the WHO, mental health nurses are healthcare professionals who specialise in working with people experiencing mental disorders. They provide care and support to people who are affected by psychiatric conditions, mental distress, and associated physical health needs.

    The role of nurses as defined by WHO guidelines includes the following:

    • Evaluation and Assessment: Nurses are responsible for conducting comprehensive assessments of people with mental illnesses.
    • Planning and Coordination of Care: Nurses play a crucial role in designing individualised care plans and coordinating care between different professionals and services.
    • Psychoeducation and Counselling: Nurses provide education to patients about their conditions and counselling to manage these conditions.
    • Crisis Intervention: Nurses are often the first point of contact in crisis situations, providing immediate care and intervention.

    Suppose a person comes to the emergency room in a state of acute mental distress. The initial task of the mental health nurse could be to calm the individual, assess their immediate needs, and secure a safe environment for care. The same nurse might then liaise with a larger multidisciplinary team to plan ongoing treatment and support, ensuring that the person's ongoing care needs are met.

    WHO guidelines place particular emphasis on the role of nurses in promoting mental health and preventing mental illness. This includes actions like promoting healthy lifestyles, providing preventive health care services, and participating in community mental health initiatives. Initiatives like these seek to reduce the incidence of mental illness and enhance the overall mental well-being of the population.

    Reviewing WHO’s Role and Mental Health in Nursing

    The World Health Organization plays a central role in shaping global health, including mental health practices within nursing. It provides invaluable resources, guidelines, and plans that highlight and promote the best practices in mental health nursing.

    How WHO Supports Mental Health in Nursing

    The WHO supports mental health in nursing through various strategies and interventions that encourage best practices and continued learning. These interventions ensure standardised and quality care worldwide leading to improved mental health outcomes.

    The World Health Organization describes itself as the directing and coordinating authority on international health within the United Nations system. It provides leadership on health matters, shapes the health research agenda, sets norms and standards, articulates evidence-based policy options, provides technical support to countries, and monitors health trends.

    Here are some of the ways through which WHO supports mental health in nursing:

    • Educational Material: WHO provides a wealth of resources for educating nurses on mental health. This includes practical manuals, online training tools, and guidelines.
    • Policy Guidance: By offering clear policy and practice guidelines, WHO supports the integration of mental health into general health care settings where nurses often work.
    • Global Surveillance: WHO collects and disseminates data on mental health from countries around the world, aiding in identifying trends and providing evidence for policy decisions which impact mental health nursing.
    • Advocacy: WHO advocates for a greater emphasis on mental health at all levels of health care. This advocacy raises awareness about the role of nurses in mental health care.

    For example, a mental health nurse might use WHO's mental health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) as a resource for understanding best practices in diagnosing and managing mental disorders in non-specialist health settings. The nurse can also utilise WHO's policy guidance to push for integrated mental health services at their workplace, further maximising their role and impact on mental health care.

    Recommendations by the WHO for Mental Health Nursing

    The World Health Organization provides guidance and recommendations for the field of mental health nursing. These recommendations challenge the professional community to continuously improve and advance mental health care.

    Some noteworthy recommendations by the WHO for mental health nursing include:

    • Integration of Mental Health Care: The WHO recommends integrating mental health services into general health care as much as possible. Nurses should be equipped to provide mental health care within various health care environments.
    • Person-Centred Care: The WHO encourages approaches that respect the rights and individuality of those receiving care. It advocates for services that are tailored to fit the needs and preferences of each person.
    • Evidence-Based Practices: The WHO stresses the importance of using interventions that have been proven effective through scientific research.
    • Continuous Education: The WHO urges the necessity of ongoing training and education for mental health nurses, ensuring up-to-date knowledge and skills.

    Applying these recommendations to practical scenarios, mental health nurses could work within a cardiac ward to provide mental health care, demonstrating integration of mental health care. They could tailor interventions to respect patient's cultural backgrounds, showcasing person-centred care. They might use cognitive behavioural therapy to help manage a patient's anxiety, an example of an evidence-based practice. Lastly, they could engage in regular professional development sessions, reflecting WHO's emphasis on continuous education.

    WHO’s Mental Health Action Plan for Nurses: Key Highlights

    WHO's Mental Health Action Plan is an integral tool for driving change in mental health care, and it has specific implications and highlights for nurses. This action plan outlines what health systems, professionals, and societies should be doing to improve mental health.

    The WHO's Mental Health Action Plan 2013–2020 provides an action guide for all countries, focusing on collecting reliable information on mental health; providing comprehensive, integrated and responsive mental health and social care services in community-based settings; implementing strategies for promotion and prevention; and strengthening governance, advocacy, coordination, and partnership.

    Key highlights from this action plan for nurses include:

    • Workforce Development: The stated target of 50% increase in service coverage for severe mental disorders by 2020 mandates an elevated role for health professionals, including nurses.
    • Increased Access: Nurses should be in the frontline in providing care in communities and primary health care settings, greatly increasing accessibility.
    • Prevention and Promotion: The WHO lays emphasis on preventive measures and promotion of mental health, roles where nurses can significantly contribute.
    • Public Health Approach: A shift towards a public health approach rather than a purely biomedical model necessitates a broader skillset from nurses, including roles as educators and advocates.

    A practical example of these highlights can be seen in a nurse working in a community health centre. To increase access to care, the nurse provides regular mental health check-ups for locals. They deliver group education sessions promoting mental wellness strategies, thus working on prevention and promotion. They also record data about mental health trends in their community, contributing to the public health understanding of mental health.

    The Mental Health Action Plan is pivotal because it articulates a shared commitment by all WHO Member States to tackle the hidden, ignored, and often misunderstood burden of mental disorders. For nurses, this plan transcends geographical boundaries, highlighting universal principles and goals that unite their efforts in promoting better mental health care.

    Detailed look into WHO mental health initiatives

    The World Health Organization is extensively involved in numerous mental health initiatives worldwide, which serve as guiding lights for mental health nursing. These initiatives provide frameworks and resources for understanding and addressing mental health problems, ensuring quality care for all who need it.

    Current WHO Mental Health Initiatives

    The World Health Organization is involved in numerous mental health initiatives that strive to improve mental health care globally. Each initiative acts as a valuable resource for mental health nursing, offering guidelines, tools, frameworks, and data that inform best practice. In this section, you'll get acquainted with a selection of current key initiatives.

    • World Mental Health Atlas: This project gathers, compiles and disseminates data on mental health from countries worldwide. Its information can greatly assist mental health nurses in understanding global mental health trends and needs.
    • Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP): Aiming to scale up mental health care in low and middle-income countries, mhGAP offers evidence-based guidelines for non-specialists, including nurses.
    • QualityRights Initiative: This initiative aims to improve the quality of mental health services globally and promotes the rights of those with mental health conditions. It offers a toolkit for assessing and improving quality and human rights in mental health facilities.
    • Global Campaign Against Stigma and Discrimination: This initiative seeks to reduce the stigma associated with mental health issues, encouraging people to seek help. Nurses can benefit from the provided resources to learn how to address stigma in their own practice.

    An example of how mental health nurses can leverage these initiatives could be finding out about the prevalence of a certain mental disorder in their locality from the World Mental Health Atlas and using that data to advocate for appropriate resources. They might use the mhGAP guidelines to shape their approach to caring for patients with that disorder and the QualityRights Toolkit to ensure their facility upholds human rights in care delivery. Furthermore, they can use resources from the Global Campaign Against Stigma to educate their community and reduce the stigma around mental health.

    Impact and Progress of WHO Mental Health Initiatives

    WHO's mental health initiatives have made significant strides in improving global mental health practices and knowledge, directly influencing mental health nursing. They have filled knowledge gaps, crafted policies, guided education and practice, addressed stigma, and championed human rights and equality. Each initiative's impact is rather valuable to contemplate as it informs and impels nursing practice, and can be motivational for you as a mental health nurse, inspiring you to perpetuate this progress.

    Impact refers to the significant or measurable effects or changes, brought about directly or indirectly by an initiative, policy, or intervention. In the context of WHO's mental health initiatives, impact can be evaluated through a variety of indicators, such as the number of health professionals trained, changes in health policies and services, increased coverage of treatment, and shifts in public attitudes towards mental health.

    A brief overview of the impacts of the highlighted initiatives includes:

    • World Mental Health Atlas: It has provided comprehensive data on mental health resources worldwide, informing policy and service provision, including nursing practice.
    • Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP): It has led to improved availability and quality of mental health care in several low- and middle-income countries, including enhanced roles for nurses.
    • QualityRights Initiative: It has resulted in significant improvements in the quality and human rights conditions of mental health facilities.
    • Global Campaign Against Stigma and Discrimination: It has raised awareness and reduced stigma associated with mental health in multiple countries.

    For example, a mental health nurse working in a low-income country might witness first-hand the impacts of mhGAP. They might have been trained using mhGAP resources, enabling them to provide quality mental health care in a primary care setting, a previously unattainable feat. The facility where they work might have been assessed and improved using the QualityRights Toolkit, leading to better patient experiences and outcomes. Their patients might be more willing to seek help, thanks to efforts from the Global Campaign Against Stigma, and planning services might be more effective as it’s based on data from the World Mental Health Atlas.

    How WHO’s Mental Health Initiatives Inform Nursing Practice

    WHO's mental health initiatives serve as invaluable resources for mental health nurses, directly informing their practice. They offer guidelines, training, data, and tools that nurses can use to improve their knowledge, skills, and services.

    Here's how some of these initiatives inform nursing practice:

    • World Mental Health Atlas: Provides data on mental health resources and needs, aiding in service planning and advocacy.
    • Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP): Offers evidence-based guidelines and training on providing mental health care in non-specialist health settings.
    • QualityRights Initiative: Provides tools for assessing and improving quality and human rights conditions in mental health facilities.
    • Global Campaign Against Stigma and Discrimination: Provides resources for understanding and addressing stigma, improving patient encounters and outcomes.

    For instance, a nurse could use the mhGAP guidelines to shape their approach to caring for patients with depression in a primary care setting. They might use the World Mental Health Atlas to understand their locality's mental health needs, helping them to focus their efforts effectively. To ensure their facility upholds human rights in care delivery, they could consult the QualityRights Toolkit. Further, understanding and addressing stigma through resources from the Global Campaign Against Stigma can help improve their encounters with patients, building trust and facilitating open communication.

    World Health Organization Mental Health - Key takeaways

    • The prevalence of mental health disorders globally affects nearly 1 billion people, and half of these disorders appear by 14 years old, according to the World Health Organization.
    • Depression and anxiety have increased by almost 50% between 1990 and 2013, with these increments possibly being linked to escalating societal stressors.
    • Nurses play a significant role in mental health care, from understanding prevalence rates to informing resource allocation and continuing education in this critical field.
    • According to WHO, mental illnesses are characterized by abnormal thoughts, behaviours, and relationships with significant distress and impairment of functioning. Common mental illnesses include depression, bipolar affective disorder, schizophrenia, and dementia.
    • The WHO's action plan and guidelines call for nurses to not only assess, plan and coordinate care for mental health patients, but also to provide education about mental health disorders, manage crises, and actively participate in community mental health initiatives.
    World Health Organization Mental Health World Health Organization Mental Health
    Learn with 12 World Health Organization Mental Health flashcards in the free StudySmarter app

    We have 14,000 flashcards about Dynamic Landscapes.

    Sign up with Email

    Already have an account? Log in

    Frequently Asked Questions about World Health Organization Mental Health
    What is the role of the World Health Organisation in advancing Mental Health in the nursing profession?
    The World Health Organization (WHO) provides global leadership in mental health by setting standards, promoting evidence-based practices, and offering technical support to countries, including guidelines and tools for mental healthcare, some specifically targeted at the nursing profession.
    How does the World Health Organisation's mental health guidelines influence nursing practices in the UK?
    The World Health Organisation's mental health guidelines influence UK nursing practices by providing international standards for care. They advise on treatment protocols, prevention strategies, and quality of care, which UK health policies and nurse training programmes integrate to ensure high-quality mental health services.
    How does the World Health Organisation's mental health strategy impact the delivery of mental health care by nurses worldwide?
    The WHO's mental health strategy directly influences nursing practice globally by setting standards and guidelines for mental health care. It promotes the role of nurses in providing early diagnosis and care, improving awareness, and reducing stigma associated with mental health illness.
    What does the World Health Organisation's mental health action plan mean for nurses working in mental health?
    The World Health Organisation's mental health action plan emphasizes nurses' roles in promoting mental wellbeing, preventing mental disorders, providing care, and advocating for policies. WHOs plan envisions nurses at the forefront of a patient-centred approach, part of multidisciplinary and integrated mental health services.
    What are the implications of the World Health Organisation's mental health policies for nursing education and training in the UK?
    The WHO's mental health policies require nursing education and training in the UK to adopt a more holistic, patient-centred approach, ensuring nurses are equipped with skills to promote mental well-being, prevent mental illnesses and provide psychological support. This would involve incorporating WHO guidelines and strategies into the curriculum.

    Test your knowledge with multiple choice flashcards

    What roles does the World Health Organization play in supporting mental health in nursing?

    What are some key mental health initiatives by the World Health Organization (WHO)?

    What are the four objectives of the World Health Organization's Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020?

    Next

    Discover learning materials with the free StudySmarter app

    Sign up for free
    1
    About StudySmarter

    StudySmarter is a globally recognized educational technology company, offering a holistic learning platform designed for students of all ages and educational levels. Our platform provides learning support for a wide range of subjects, including STEM, Social Sciences, and Languages and also helps students to successfully master various tests and exams worldwide, such as GCSE, A Level, SAT, ACT, Abitur, and more. We offer an extensive library of learning materials, including interactive flashcards, comprehensive textbook solutions, and detailed explanations. The cutting-edge technology and tools we provide help students create their own learning materials. StudySmarter’s content is not only expert-verified but also regularly updated to ensure accuracy and relevance.

    Learn more
    StudySmarter Editorial Team

    Team Nursing Teachers

    • 25 minutes reading time
    • Checked by StudySmarter Editorial Team
    Save Explanation Save Explanation

    Study anywhere. Anytime.Across all devices.

    Sign-up for free

    Sign up to highlight and take notes. It’s 100% free.

    Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App

    The first learning app that truly has everything you need to ace your exams in one place

    • Flashcards & Quizzes
    • AI Study Assistant
    • Study Planner
    • Mock-Exams
    • Smart Note-Taking
    Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App
    Sign up with Email

    Get unlimited access with a free StudySmarter account.

    • Instant access to millions of learning materials.
    • Flashcards, notes, mock-exams, AI tools and more.
    • Everything you need to ace your exams.
    Second Popup Banner