Growing Perpetuity Formula

Explore the intricacies of the Growing Perpetuity Formula, a vital tool in business studies and finance theory. This detailed guide uncovers the core principles of growing perpetuity, diving into significant factors that influence it, and its relation to concepts such as Present Value, Deferred Growing Perpetuity, Terminal Value, and more. Providing a comprehensive understanding, the guide also breaks down mathematical representations for deriving the formula, calculates future value using it, and dives into its application in corporate finance. A beneficial read for students, finance professionals and business enthusiasts alike, enrich your knowledge on Growing Perpetuity Formula's utility in computing net present value, dividends, and long-term financial planning.

Growing Perpetuity Formula Growing Perpetuity Formula

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Contents
Table of contents

    Understanding the Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The growing perpetuity formula is an important concept in finance, particularly in the field of business and equity valuation. It represents a series of infinite periodic cash flows that grow at a consistent rate. It's often used to calculate the present value of a business or investment, providing you with an idea of its worth in today's money terms.

    Basics of Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The standard formula for the growing perpetuity is given by: \[ PV = \frac{C} {r - g} \] where:

    • \(PV\) is the present value of the perpetuity
    • \(C\) is the cash flow received at the end of the first period
    • \(r\) is the discount rate
    • \(g\) is the growth rate

    This formula helps in valuing an investment or business whose cash flow patterns have constant growth. For instance, dividends from a stable company may rise at a certain constant rate annually. In such a scenario, growing perpetuity formula offers a helpful tool to estimate the present value of these expected future cash inflows.

    For instance, assume a company declares a £100 dividend at the end of the first year and you expect the dividends to grow at 5% each year. If the investor's required rate of return is 10%, using the growing perpetuity formula, the present value of the stock can be calculated as: \[ PV = \frac{100} {0.10 - 0.05} = £2000 \]

    Factors Influencing Growing Perpetuity Formula

    Several factors come into play when calculating the present value of a growing perpetuity. To extract the most accurate estimation, you need to comprehend how each factor influences the overall calculations:

    FactorInfluence on the Perpetuity Formula
    Discount Rate (r)It's the rate of return required by an investor. A higher discount rate lowers the present value, while a lower rate increases it.
    Cash Flow (C)The initial cash flow or payment forms the base for the series of future cash flows. Greater cash flow results in a higher present value.
    Growth Rate (g)It represents the anticipated constant increase in future cash flows. A higher growth rate augments the present value.

    Empirically, the growth rate should not exceed the discount rate. If the growth rate is larger than the discount rate, the formula serves no practical purpose as it infers infinite value. In reality, earnings or cash flows cannot grow continually at a rate superior to the discount rate.

    Understanding and accurately estimating these parameters is a crucial part of financial analysis and serves as a cornerstone for valuations, especially in capital budgeting and equity valuation exercises.

    The Present Value of Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The concept of present value plays an integral role in the growing perpetuity formula. Present Value (PV) refers to the current worth of future payments or streams of payments that grow at a constant rate. In simpler terms, it tells you what money to be received in the future is worth today.

    Explanation of Present Value in Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The present value element of the growing perpetuity formula is the measurement you are trying to find. You could think of the present value as representing the initial investment needed today to generate the stipulated growing series of future cash flows without any further injections of capital.

    To summarise:

    • Present Value (PV): This is the value at the present time of future cash flows, considering a certain rate of return or discount rate.
    • Discount Rate (r): This parameter is the rate of return required by an investor, which can also be understood as the cost of capital. The discount rate takes into account the time value of money, as it compounds over time.
    • Cash Flow (C): Referring to the amount projected to be received at the end of the first period, which is expected to increase at a consistent rate thereafter.
    • Growth Rate (g): This stands for the rate at which cash flows, such as dividends or rental income, are expected to grow each year. This growth is assumed to be constant.

    Calculating Present Value of Growing Perpetuity

    Calculating the present value of growing perpetuity involves using the formula \[ PV = \frac{C} {r - g} \] in applying the values of cash flow 'C', discount rate 'r', and growth rate 'g'. It's worth noting that the growth rate annually should be less than the discount rate for the formula to hold mathematical validity.

    Consider an example where a company is generating a cash flow of £1,000,000 at the end of the first year and these cash flows are expected to grow by 3% per annum. If the discount rate is 8%, using the growing perpetuity formula: \[ PV = \frac{1000000} {0.08 - 0.03} = £20000000 \]

    In other situations, you might need to find the discount rate or growth rate, given the cash flow and present value information. It’s possible to rearrange the equation to solve for these unknown parameters:

    \begin{itemize}
  • To calculate 'r': \[ r = \frac{C} {PV} + g \]
  • To calculate 'g': \[ g = r - \frac{C} {PV} \]
  • These computations and their insightful interpretations constitute the crux of financial mathematics in real world applications, aiding in the robust financial decision-making process. Remember, the importance of these calculations varies depending on the nature and horizon of your investment, its economic environment, along with assumptions about cash flows and their growth.

    Delayed and Deferred Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The concepts of delayed and deferred growing perpetuities are extensions of the standard growing perpetuity formula. They apply in scenarios where cash flows don’t commence immediately but start after a certain period or are postponed to a later date.

    Differences between Delayed and Deferred Growing Perpetuity Formula

    In essence, both delayed and deferred perpetuities are based on the foundational principle of growing perpetuity, but the timing of cash flows differ.

    A delayed growing perpetuity signifies a scenario where the start of the cash flow is postponed but once initiated, it grows at a constant rate indefinitely. On the other hand, a deferred growing perpetuity refers to a case where the payment or cash flow growth doesn’t start right away, but once initiated, the growth or payment increases at a constant rate indefinitely.

    In mathematical terms, the formulas follow a simple alteration from the standard growing perpetuity formula. Specifically:

    1. For the delayed growing perpetuity: \[ PV = \frac{C} {(1 + r)^n (r - g)} \] Where \(n\) represents the number of periods before the cash flows start.
    2. For the deferred growing perpetuity: \[ PV = \frac{C} {(1 + r)^n} + \frac{C (1 + g)^n} {(1 + r)^n (r - g)} \] Where \(n\) is the number of periods the growth in cash flows is deferred.

    Usage of Delayed Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The delayed growing perpetuity formula can be applied in scenarios where the cash flows from an investment don't begin right away, but are expected to commence after a certain number of periods and subsequently grow at a constant rate indefinitely.

    One of the main contexts this formula is utilised is in the valuation of properties with lease agreements that start in the future and increase every subsequent year at a steady rate. They're also used for long-term forecasting in financial models.

    The application involves plugging in the appropriate numbers into the formula \[ PV = \frac{C} {(1 + r)^n (r - g)} \]. As an investor, be mindful to comprehend the implications of the 'n' variable signifying the delay period.

    For example, suppose an investor expects to receive a payment of £1000 one year from now, with subsequent annual payments increasing at a rate of 3% per year indefinitely. If the discount rate is 5%, the present value of this delayed growing perpetuity would be: \[ PV = \frac{1000} {(1 + 0.05)(0.05 - 0.03)} = £50,000 \]

    Understanding Deferred Growing Perpetuity Formula

    A deferred growing perpetuity situation arises when both the cash flows and their growth are postponed to a future period. In other words, not only do the cash flows start late, but their growth also begins from a future date.

    This scenario is typically seen in investments like pension schemes where payments start after retirement, and each subsequent payment is increased to account for inflation or cost of living adjustments. These payments are assumed to continue indefinitely, thereby creating a deferred growing perpetuity.

    The formula to calculate the present value of a deferred growing perpetuity is \[ PV = \frac{C} {(1 + r)^n} + \frac{C (1 + g)^n} {(1 + r)^n (r - g)} \]

    For instance, consider an individual who starts receiving an annual pension of £50,000, 10 years from now, and this amount is expected to grow by 2% per year indefinitely thereafter. If we take a discount rate of 5%, the present value of this deferred growing perpetuity would be: \[ PV = \frac{50000} {(1.05)^{10}} + \frac{50000 (1.02)^{10}} {(1.05)^{10}(0.05 - 0.02)} = £664,079.16 \]

    In conclusion, both delayed and deferred growing perpetuity formulae provide useful models for understanding and deriving the present value of such investments or cash flow streams and are vital tools in financial decision making.

    Derivation of Growing Perpetuity Formula

    Understanding the derivation of formulas in financial mathematics is essential to thoroughly comprehend their application in real-world scenarios. It allows you to better grasp their inherent logic, facilitating more sophisticated financial reasoning and decision-making. The same applies to the growing perpetuity formula, a cornerstone concept in finance, especially in valuing financial investments and securities that produce a perpetuity of cash flows which continuously increase at a steady rate.

    Mathematical Representation of Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The growing perpetuity formula computes the present value of an infinite stream of cash flows that grow at a constant rate and is represented as:

    \[ PV = \frac{C} {r - g} \]

    Here:

    • \(PV\): Present Value of the growing perpetuity
    • \(C\): Cash flow at the end of the first period
    • \(r\): Annual discount rate
    • \(g\): Constant growth rate of the cash flows

    The formula assumes that the first cash flow 'C' is received one period from now, and all future cash flows increase at a steady rate 'g' for an indefinite period of time. The calculation takes into account the time value of money, which is the concept that money available today is more valuable than the identical sum in the future due to its potential earning capacity. This core principle provides the basis for the discount rate 'r'.

    Steps to Derive the Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The derivation of the growing perpetuity formula can be shown using a geometric series. A geometric series \( S \) is the sum of a sequence of terms, each of which, after the first, is found by multiplying the preceding term by a fixed, non-zero number 'g'. In our context, 'g' is the growth rate of the perpetuity.

    Given a perpetuity with cash flow \( C \) growing at a rate of 'g' per period and a discount rate 'r', the present value \( PV \) is the sum of the discounted values of all future cash flows.

    Mathematically, this can be expressed as:

    \[ PV = \frac{C} {(1+r)} + \frac{C (1+g)} {(1+r)^2} + \frac{C (1+g)^2} {(1+r)^3} + \frac{C (1+g)^3} {(1+r)^4} + \ldots \]

    If we multiply both sides of this equation by \((1+g)/(1+r)\), we get:

    \[ \frac{PV(1+g)} {(1+r)} = \frac{C} {(1+r)^2} + \frac{C (1+g)} {(1+r)^3} + \frac{C (1+g)^2} {(1+r)^4} + \ldots \]

    This rearranges the terms in the original formula, aligning them such that every term in the right-hand-side of equation (1) matches a corresponding term in equation (2). Subtracting equation (2) from equation (1) thus cancels out these corresponding terms, leaving us with:

    \[ PV - \frac{PV(1+g)} {(1+r)} = \frac{C} {(1+r)} \]

    This simplifies down to the standard growing perpetuity formula:

    \[ PV = \frac{C} {r - g} \]

    This derivation helps us understand that the growing perpetuity formula is an outcome of the sum of an infinite geometric progression. It reinforces the prerequisite that the discount rate must be greater than the growth rate for the formula to hold mathematically. Otherwise, the present value would tend towards infinity.

    Calculating Future Value using the Growing Perpetuity Formula

    The concept of growing perpetuity is a significant tool in financial analysis, allowing businesses and investors alike to forecast cash flows and valuation of investments that persist indefinitely and grow at a constant rate. An extension of this concept arises when one needs to calculate the future value of these cashflows. Determining future value in growing perpetuity involves projecting the worth of these cash flows at a specific future point in time, considering their consistent growth.

    Concept of Future Value in Growing Perpetuity

    The Future Value of cash flows, as opposed to the Present Value, refers to the value of these cash flows at a specific point in the future rather than in current terms. Specifically, in the context of growing perpetuity, it represents the value of the ever-increasing and infinite cash flows at a certain future date.

    Just as in the Present Value calculations, the future value computations cater to the idea of the time value of money, meaning the value of money decreases over time, making a pound today worth more than a pound tomorrow because of the potential earning capacity. However, unlike present value which discounts future cash flows back to the present, future value compounds the cash flows forward to project their worth at a future date.

    When the cash flows increase perpetually at a constant growth rate, as in a growing perpetuity, the future value projections consider both the compounding effect of the money and the constant growth of the cash flows over the projectable period.

    Future Value (FV) in financial analysis relates to the projected value of an investment, cash flow, series of cash flows at a specified date in future, based on a computed interest rate. It primarily involves the principles of compound interest and the time value of money.

    How to Calculate the Future Value of a Growing Perpetuity

    The calculation of the future value of a growing perpetuity does not involve a straightforward formula, unlike the present value, due to the instrinsic characteristic of perpetuity i.e., the cash flows never end. Hence, directly determining a future value is essentially futile as the value would theoretically be infinite. Therefore, you need to calculate the present value first, then determine the future value with a given number of periods into the future.

    Let's break down the two steps involved in detail:

    Step 1: Calculating the Present Value (PV) of the Growing Perpetuity

    Before you can calculate future value, you need to find out the present value of the growing perpetuity. For this, you will use the standard growing perpetuity formula:

    \[ PV = \frac{C} {r - g} \]

    Here:

    • \(PV\): Present Value of the growing perpetuity
    • \(C\): Cash flow at the end of the first period
    • \(r\): Annual discount rate
    • \(g\): Constant growth rate of the cash flows

    Step 2: Calculating the Future Value (FV) with the Present Value

    Subsequently, you employ the Future Value of Present Value formula, which compounds the present value forward a specified number of periods (n) with a compounding rate (r). Mathematically,

    \[ FV = PV \times (1 + r)^n \]

    Here:

    • \(FV\): Calculated Future Value
    • \(PV\): Present Value calculated in Step 1
    • \(r\): Compounding (discount) rate
    • \(n\): Number of periods (usually years) into future

    The computed future value will give the numerical worth of the growing perpetuity's cash flows at the future date considering the cash flows growth and the time value of money. Always remember that even though it is theoretically an infinite cash flow stream, you are projecting the value only till a finite point in time.

    For instance, for a series of cash flows starting at £1000, growing at 3% per year, with a discount rate of 5% and for a future point 10 years from now. The present value can be calculated as: \(PV = \frac{1000} {0.05 - 0.03} = £50000\). Using this PV to find future value: \(FV = 50000 \times (1 + 0.05)^{10} = £81444.61\).

    It's important to comprehend that the calculated future value represents a theoretic projection. It assumes the principles of growing perpetuity to hold true over the given period, without any unforeseen events interrupting the perpetual nature or growth rate of the cash flows. As such, use caution while making financial decisions based on this future value.

    Growing Perpetuity Formula Terminal Value

    The growing perpetuity formula is a powerful tool in financial calculations, enabling investors and business leaders to comprehend and value investments with infinite cash flows that grow at a constant rate. An additional facet of the formula arises when it comes to calculating terminal value, especially in the realm of financial valuation and modelling. Recognising and calculating terminal value within the framework of growing perpetuity can enhance understanding of the formula's implications and provide profound insights into future financial projections.

    Understanding Terminal Value in Growing Perpetuity Formula

    Terminal Value in financial analysis refers to the present value of all future cash flows of an investment, business, or project beyond a specified projection period. In other words, it represents the aggregated value of cash flows beyond a point in the future when these cash flows become somewhat stable and can be anticipated to grow at a constant rate indefinitely.

    Terminal Value (TV) can be looked upon as the horizon value of an asset, project or business, representative of its worth beyond a stipulated forecast period, when its cash flows are expected to continue growing perpetually at a constant growth rate.

    In the context of growing perpetuity, Terminal Value takes the form of a perpetuity which grows at a steady rate, and hence, the growing perpetuity formula can be employed to determine its present value. Specifically, for a series of cash flows projecting over a specific period, the terminal value will represent the present value of all cash flows, which continue into perpetuity, starting from the end of that period.

    Mathematically, the terminal value, using a growing perpetuity formula, for a series of cash flows 'C', growing at a stable rate 'g', and their present value being discounted at a rate 'r', starting from a period 'n' is represented by:

    \[ TV = \frac{C \times (1 + g)^n} {r - g} \]

    Now, let's break down these variables for a clearer understanding:

    • \(TV\): Terminal Value at the end of the projection period
    • \(C\): Cash flow at the end of the projection period
    • \(g\): Constant growth rate of the cash flows beyond the projection period
    • \(r\): Annual discount rate
    • \(n\): The number of periods (usually years) up to the end of projection

    By adding the calculated terminal value to the discounted value of short-term cash flows within the projection period, you can determine the entire value of the cash flows under consideration.

    How Terminal Value Affects the Growing Perpetuity Formula Calculation

    The incorporation of Terminal Value into Growing Perpetuity calculations profoundly impacts the outcome. It embeds the notion of indefinite future growth into the financial models that, in turn, heavily influence valuation and investment decision-making. Rendering a deeper analysis, you can divide the entire value of perpetuity into two parts: the short-term cash flows up to a chosen point, and the terminal value representing the infinite cash flows beyond.

    The terminal value generally forms a significant part of the calculation as it accounts for the enduring nature of the investment, and hence may factor in a substantial chunk of the overall present value in numerous instances. However, it's essential to remember that terminal value calculations, and by extension, growing perpetuity calculations depend on certain assumptions that may not hold true in real-world situations.

    For instance, assuming a constant growth rate beyond a certain point could be unrealistic in a turbulent economic environment. Similarly, the expected discount rate may alter drastically over time. The overall valuation becomes particularly hypersensitive to these assumptions when the terminal value holds a large proportion of it. Therefore, using terminal value meaningfully involves a delicate balancing act.

    In this context, choosing an appropriate date to calculate the terminal value becomes crucial. For instance, calculating the terminal value too soon might overweigh the perpetuity assumption, leading to potential overvaluation. On the contrary, choosing a date too far off might undervalue the growing aspect of the cash flows, thus potentially undervaluing the investment.

    To highlight, consider cash flows starting at £5000, expected to increase at a constant rate of 2% per annum, with a discount rate of 7%. Further, imagine the projection period is 5 years. The Terminal Value at the end of the fifth year can be calculated as: \(TV = \frac{5000 \times (1 + 0.02)^5} {0.07 - 0.02} = £83980.53\).

    Recognising these nuances and understanding the implications of terminal value on growing perpetuity calculations can enhance your proficiency in financial modelling and valuation, enabling more informed financial decision-making.

    Dividend Growing Perpetuity Formula and NPV Calculation

    In the realm of corporate finance and investment analysis, dividends hold a vital role. Specifically, when discussions centre on stocks that pay regular dividends, which increase at a constant rate. To evaluate such investment opportunities, the Dividend Growing Perpetuity Formula is a pivotal tool. Tying this to your understanding of the Net Present Value (NPV) calculation can empower you in financial analysis and decision-making.

    The use of Dividend Growing Perpetuity in Corporate Finance

    In Corporate Finance, correctly valuing investments and understanding potential growth scenarios is critical. You must often make decisions based on the future returns of an investment, the risk associated with it, and the present value of its future cash flows. Here is where the application of the Dividend Growing Perpetuity formula becomes significant.

    For a stock that pays dividends which grow at a constant rate, the Dividend Growing Perpetuity Formula allows you to calculate the present value of all future dividends. Mathematically, if 'D' is the dividend amount expected in the next period, 'g' is the steady growth rate of dividends, and 'r' is the required rate of return or discount rate, the present value 'P' of the dividend-paying stock can be calculated as:

    \[ P = \frac{D}{r - g} \]

    Essentially, this formula helps you consider the implications of perpetual growth in dividends whilst conducting the financial valuation. It allows you to make informed decisions about investing in such dividend-paying stocks, lending you an understanding of the value you may receive in the future, in terms of ever-growing dividends.

    In the context of corporate finance, this formula can serve multiple purposes:

    • Evaluation of investments in perpetual dividend-growing stocks
    • Comparison between different dividend-paying investments
    • Assessing the feasibility of such stocks in the investment portfolio from a returns perspective
    • Measurement of potential growth scenarios

    Despite its versatility, the Growing Dividend Perpetuity formula is rooted in a few assumptions that may not always hold. For instance, assuming that dividends will grow perpetually at a constant rate may be a strong assumption, especially in an ever-changing business context. Hence, while the formula provides a valuable framework for financial analysis, its results should be interpreted considering the underlying assumptions.

    How to Calculate the NPV of a Growing Perpetuity

    Net Present Value (NPV) is a fundamental concept in financial analysis, serving as a measure of the profitability of an investment or project. It calculates the present value of all future cash flows of an investment less the initial investment. For a growing perpetuity, things become a bit more complex as the cash flows extend indefinitely and grow at a constant rate. In this situation, a different variation of the NPV formula comes into play:

    \[ NPV = \frac{C \times (1 + g)} {r - g} - I \]

    Here, 'C' represents the first cash flow received at the end of the first period, 'g' is the constant growth rate of the cash flows, 'r' is the discount rate, and 'I' is the initial investment. This provides the net value of your investment after considering the present value of all future growing cash flows and the initial expenditure.

    Let's assume you are making an investment of £10,000, which is expected to generate a cash flow of £1200 in the first year, growing at a steady rate of 2% every year. If the discount rate is 5%, the NPV can be calculated as following: \(NPV = \frac{1200 \times (1 + 0.02)}{0.05 - 0.02} - 10000 = £4433.33\). Thus, the investment is profitable as the NPV is positive.

    The calculation of the NPV of a growing perpetuity can offer substantial value in various scenarios. Whether you are assessing the feasibility of an investment, comparing different investment options, deciding on the most rewarding projects, or simply attempting to understand the growth and return dynamics of a growing cash flow stream, the NPV of growing perpetuity can provide critical insights to inform your decision-making process.

    For corporations, evaluating the NPV of projects that are expected to generate growing cash flows indefinitely can be particularly useful in strategic decision-making, capital budgeting, and long-term financial planning. By contrasting the NPV against the initial investment, companies can judge the profitability of such ventures, thereby making sound and informed strategic decisions.

    Again, it's important to bear in mind the assumptions underlying these calculations. From the constant growth rate to the selected discount rate, each element can profoundly influence the NPV outcome. Therefore, the calculated NPV should be appropriately interpreted within these parameters, and adjustments should be made to cater for any significant changes in these parameters over time.

    Growing Perpetuity Formula - Key takeaways

    • Delayed Growing Perpetuity formula: \( PV = \frac{C} {(1 + r)^n (r - g)} \), where \(n\) represents the number of periods before the cash flows start.
    • Deferred Growing Perpetuity formula: \( PV = \frac{C} {(1 + r)^n} + \frac{C (1 + g)^n} {(1 + r)^n (r - g)} \), where \(n\) is the number of periods the growth in cash flows is deferred.
    • Process to derive the growing perpetuity formula includes using a geometric series formula and applying a special rearrangement to subtract and simplify into the standard growing perpetuity formula \(PV = \frac{C} {r - g}\).
    • To calculate the Future Value of a Growing Perpetuity, first determine the Present Value using the standard Growing Perpetuity formula and then use Future Value of Present Value formula to compound it forward a specified number of periods.
    • The Terminal Value in the Growing Perpetuity formula represents the present value of all future cash flows beyond a specified projection period, \(TV = \frac{C \times (1 + g)^n} {r - g}\).
    Growing Perpetuity Formula Growing Perpetuity Formula
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    Frequently Asked Questions about Growing Perpetuity Formula
    How do you calculate a growth perpetuity?
    Growth perpetuity can be calculated using the formula P = D / (r-g), where P is the present value, D is the dividend payment, r is the discount rate, and g is the rate of growth.
    What is a growing perpetuity?
    A growing perpetuity is a series of periodic payments that grow at a proportionate rate and continue indefinitely. It's often used in finance to calculate the present value of distinct cash flows, that grow at a constant rate, continuing into eternity.
    How do you calculate the NPV of a growing perpetuity?
    The NPV (Net Present Value) of a growing perpetuity can be calculated using the formula: NPV = D / (r - g), where D is the cash inflow in the first period, r is the discount rate, and g is the growth rate of the cash flow.
    What does constant growth rate in perpetuity mean?
    Constant growth rate in perpetuity refers to a theoretical sequence of an ongoing sequence of cash flows that grow at a fixed percentage rate indefinitely. It's often used in business and finance to calculate the present value of a company, stock, or cash flows.
    What is a perpetuity? Could you provide an example, please?
    Perpetuity is a financial term referring to an endless or indefinite stream of cash flows. An example is a government bond that guarantees interest payments indefinitely with no repayment of the initial sum.

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