|
|
First Law of Thermodynamics For Open System

Dive deep into the world of thermodynamics with a focus on the First Law of Thermodynamics for Open System. This comprehensive guide elucidates the basics, key parameters, and the impact this law has on open systems. Understand the equation and its application, follow the step-by-step derivation, comprehend how to state the law accurately, and explore real-world examples. Analyse how the mechanism of the First Law of Thermodynamics applies in practical scenarios. This insightful review provides a thorough understanding of this fundamental piece of physics, making it an indispensable resource for any engineering student or professional.

Mockup Schule

Explore our app and discover over 50 million learning materials for free.

First Law of Thermodynamics For Open System

Illustration

Lerne mit deinen Freunden und bleibe auf dem richtigen Kurs mit deinen persönlichen Lernstatistiken

Jetzt kostenlos anmelden

Nie wieder prokastinieren mit unseren Lernerinnerungen.

Jetzt kostenlos anmelden
Illustration

Dive deep into the world of thermodynamics with a focus on the First Law of Thermodynamics for Open System. This comprehensive guide elucidates the basics, key parameters, and the impact this law has on open systems. Understand the equation and its application, follow the step-by-step derivation, comprehend how to state the law accurately, and explore real-world examples. Analyse how the mechanism of the First Law of Thermodynamics applies in practical scenarios. This insightful review provides a thorough understanding of this fundamental piece of physics, making it an indispensable resource for any engineering student or professional.

Understanding the First Law of Thermodynamics for Open System

The First Law of Thermodynamics, simply stated, is a principle regarding energy and its conservation. When it comes to an open system - a system that exchanges both energy and mass with its surroundings - the law takes a slightly different form. So, let's explore the basics along with some key underlying principles.

Basics of the First Law of Thermodynamics for Open System

The First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system deals with three kinds of systems: closed, open, and isolated. A closed system allows energy transfer but disallows mass transfer. An isolated system prohibits both energy and mass transfer, while an open system permits both.

In any open system, energy can either enter or leave the system. This energy can come in various forms such as heat, work, and mass. The law thus helps us understand the exchange of energy between the system and its surroundings.

Energy Balance for an Open System essentially states that the total energy entering a system should equate the total energy leaving the system, plus the change in system's internal energy.

This can be mathematically represented as \[ \Delta E_{system} = Q_{in} - W_{out} + m_{in}e_{in} - m_{out}e_{out} \]

  • \(Q_{in}\) is the heat entering the system
  • \(W_{out}\) is the work done by the system on its surroundings
  • \(m_{in}e_{in}\) is the energy entering the system via mass
  • \(m_{out}e_{out}\) is the energy leaving the system via mass

This equation makes it clear that energy can neither be created nor destroyed - it can only be converted from one form to another. This fundamental principle is what drives phenomena like heat transfer and fluid flow in engineering applications.

Key principles underlying the First Law of Thermodynamics in an Open System

In the context of the First Law of Thermodynamics for Open Systems, several key principles come into play. Let's deconstruct these for a better understanding.

Firstly, the concept of system boundaries is crucial. The open system is separated from its surroundings by a control boundary. Both mass and energy cross this boundary. Based on the nature of this energy transfer, we define three kinds of boundaries - diathermic (allows transfer of heat), adiabatic (disallows heat transfer), and porous (allows mass transfer).

For example, a steam boiler is an open system. The water enters the boiler (mass flow in), heat is added (heat flow in), and steam is ejected (mass and energy flow out).

Secondly, the principle of conservation of energy. It is a foundational principle which states that Energy can neither be created nor destroyed, but only transformed from one form to another.

Thirdly, the concept of Energy Transfer by Heat, Work and Mass. Heat is the transfer of energy due to the difference in temperature between the system and surroundings. Work is the transfer of energy due to forces applied by the system on its surroundings, while mass is the transport of energy across the system boundaries.

Finally, the concept of the energy interaction between an open system and its surroundings is primarily categorized into heat transfer, work done, and mass flow.

These principles underlie the concepts and applications of the First Law of Thermodynamics for Open Systems in various realms of science and engineering. Understanding these principles is a stepping stone towards mastering the concept.

First Law of Thermodynamics Equation for Open System

The equation that represents the First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System is a simple manifestation of energy conservation. It comprehends the three possible ways energy can be transferred: heat transfer, work done, and mass flow. This equation succinctly communicates how energy, in its myriad forms, is transacted between the open system and its environment.

Breaking Down the First Law of Thermodynamics Equation

Let's break down the equation for clarity. It is expressed as:

\[ \Delta E_{system} = Q_{in} - W_{out} + m_{in}e_{in} - m_{out}e_{out} \]

Here, \(\Delta E_{system}\) refers to the change in internal energy of the system. The \(Q_{in}\) factor accounts for the heat energy entering the system, while \(W_{out}\) denotes the work done by the system on its surroundings. \(m_{in}e_{in}\) and \(m_{out}e_{out}\) respectively signify the energy brought in and taken out by mass.

It's essential to understand these terms:

  • \(Q_{in}\): Heat energy entering the system. Heat is energy transferred due to the temperature gradient existing between the system and its surroundings.
  • \(W_{out}\): Work done by the system. In thermodynamics, work is the energy transferred due to the application of external forces by the system.
  • \(m_{in}e_{in}\) and \(m_{out}e_{out}\): Energy entering and leaving the system by mass, respectively. This component is often significant in engineering applications like turbines and compressors, where considerable mass flow rates are involved.

Note that energy balances are contingent on the nature of the system and its particular conditions. For steady-state systems (where properties remain constant over time), the internal energy remains the same, with no accumulation or depletion over time. This sets \(\Delta E_{system}\) to zero.

Deriving and Applying the Equation in an Open System

The First Law of Thermodynamics applied to an open system can be derived from the law's general form by accounting for the system boundary's permeability to mass flow. This gives us flexibility in examining systems where mass inclusion proves significant.

To derive this, consider an infinitesimally small control volume in the system, so small that properties are uniform throughout. The energy balance for this control volume, based on the principles discussed earlier, is:

\[ \Delta E_{CV} = Q_{in, CV} - W_{out, CV} + m_{in, CV}e_{in, CV} - m_{out, CV}e_{out, CV} \]

For a steady-state system, \(\Delta E_{CV} = 0\), meaning the system is at equilibrium, yielding:

\[ 0 = Q_{in} - W_{out} + m_{in}e_{in} - m_{out}e_{out} \]

This equation finds use across various applications. For instance, turbines, boilers, and compressors in power generations are open systems where understanding energy transactions is essential to improving efficiency. Engineers can use this equation to derive the performance and efficiency of such systems. Predicting the system's response under different operating conditions helps identify performance limits and identify parameters that can be modified to enhance efficiency.

While considering practical applications, assumptions may be made to simplify the analysis. These assumptions, such as ignoring potential or kinetic energy changes or considering the process to be quasi-static, help simplify the equation based on system-specific characteristics.

Understanding the derivation and application of the aforementioned equation offers a cornerstone thermodynamics principle enhancing an engineer's problem-solving prowess.

Derivation of First Law of Thermodynamics for Open System

The derivation of the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system begins by taking into account the system's ability to exchange both energy and mass with its surroundings. Although there are multiple steps to this process, when broken down, they are achievable with a sound understanding of physics and calculus.

Step-by-Step Derivation Process for First Law of Thermodynamics

The process starts with the general form of First Law of Thermodynamics, which dictates the energetical relationship between an isolated system and its surroundings. For an open system, however, this equation takes a different form that accommodates the flow of mass in addition to heat and work. Consequently, the energy flow of the system is governed by three components: heat, work, and mass.

The general equation for the First Law of Thermodynamics is defined as:

\[ \delta Q = dU + \delta W \]

Here, \(\delta Q\) stands for the total heat of the system, \(dU\) for the change in internal energy, and \(\delta W\) represents the work done by/on the system.

To break down the above equation: heat (\(\delta Q\)) added to an open system can either increase its internal energy (\(dU\)) or perform work (\(\delta W\)). Note that \(\delta Q\) and \(\delta W\) herein are path-dependent differential quantities, whereas \(dU\) depends only on the initial and final states of the system parameters.

Now, we extend this logic to an open system, which allows not only heat and work to cross its boundaries but also mass. When mass enters or leaves, it carries with it its own energy.

The adjusted general equation for an open system is therefore:

\[ \delta Q = dU + \delta W + \delta E_{mass} \]

where \(\delta E_{mass}\) is the change in energy associated with mass transfer. This equation now portrays a more comprehensive picture, where energy can flow through three channels: heat transfer, the work done, and the mass inflow or outflow.

The final equation, representing the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system, is then obtained:

\[ dU = \delta Q - \delta W - \delta E_{mass} \]

This equation elegantly communicates that the change in internal energy can be given by the heat supplied to the system, work done by the system and mass-energy transfer aspects; ultimately providing a profound basis for numerous practical engineering approaches.

Practical Application of the Derivation in Open Systems

Derivation of the First Law of Thermodynamics for open systems offers a comprehensive basis for understanding numerous practical applications in fields such as chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, material science, and aeronautics. Engineers frequently deal with non-insulated (or open) systems in real-world scenarios such as turbines, heat exchangers, reactor vessels, and boilers, where internal energy variations play a pivotal role.

Consider an example of a steam turbine. The steam entering the turbine carries energy in the form of enthalpy (a combination of internal and flow energy). As it flows through the turbine, a part of this thermal energy is converted into mechanical work, and the remainder leaves the turbine with the outgoing mass flow (i.e., the steam). Analysing this with the First Law can help optimize a system's operational conditions or efficiency ratios.

Similarly, another practical example could be the operation of a refrigerator. Here, work is done on the system (compressing the refrigerant), which eventually extracts heat from the interior and rejects it to the surroundings, displaying an intuitive application of the First Law in an open system.

Further, this concept's comprehension helps resolve more challenging engineering problems, such as evaluating the performance of a power cycle or an air conditioning system, where energy transfer methods are multiple and convoluted.

In summary, the derivation of the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system is a cornerstone concept in various scientific domains. Understanding and applying this principle are fundamental aspects for budding scientists and engineers. They are involved in designing efficient, sustainable, and innovative solutions to overcome today's pressing energy-related challenges.

Stating the First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System

Stating the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system requires an understanding that the system can interact with its surroundings through the transfer of mass and energy. The Law, at its root level, is the principle of conservation of energy and is tailored to accommodate these energy and mass interactions in an open system.

Fundamentals of stating the First Law of Thermodynamics

Before we dive into the specifics of stating the law for an open system, it would be beneficial to familiarise ourselves with the foundational concepts and terminologies that underpin the law.

The essential terms that you would encounter while discussing the First Law of Thermodynamics include:

  • System: This is what you are studying. In thermodynamics, a system could be any part of the universe that you have decided to focus on.
  • Surroundings: Everything else that isn't your system. The surroundings influence the system through interactions across the system boundary.
  • Boundary: The conceptual line or physical barrier that demarcates the system from its surroundings. A boundary may allow or disallow exchanges of heat, work, and mass depending on what kind of system boundary it is (open, closed or isolated).
  • Heat: Denoted by \(Q\), heat is energy transferred due to the temperature difference between the system and its surroundings.
  • Work: Denoted by \(W\), work is the energy transferred due to forces acting across the system boundary.
  • Internal Energy: Denoted by \(U\), internal energy refers to the total energy of a thermodynamic system. It includes kinetic and potential energy of the molecules and any energy associated with the system's internal structure.

Putting these together, we can say that the First Law of Thermodynamics for a closed system is usually stated as follows:

\[ dU = \delta Q - \delta W \]

This equation tells us that the change in internal energy (\(U\)) of a closed system is equal to the heat supplied to it (\(Q\)) minus the work done by the system (\(W\)). However, in an open system, mass is also allowed to cross the boundary. And with mass, comes the energy that it possesses. This necessitates an additional term in the First Law to account for the energy transported in or out by mass. Consequently, the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system can be stated as:

\[ dU = \delta Q - \delta W - \delta E_{mass} \]

Here, \(\delta E_{mass}\) represents the energy transferred due to mass flow in or out of the system.

Importance of Accurate Stating of the Law in Open Systems

The precise statement of the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system is of paramount importance in various scientific and engineering disciplines. A minor misunderstanding or misinterpretation can often lead to oversights and errors in thermodynamic analyses and designs of processes and systems. It essentially liaises between theoretical concepts and practical applications.

Engineers often work with open systems like boilers, turbines, air conditioning systems, automatic dishwashers, heat exchangers and more. The correct statement and understanding of the First Law provide invaluable insight into how these systems function. It aids in the formulation of mathematical models which are then used to predict and enhance performance and efficiency.

For instance, understanding how work, heat, and mass flow interact to determine a system's internal energy change can make significant differences when designing an energy-efficient industrial process. If a particular system isn't performing as expected, a solid understanding of the First Law for an open system could help pinpoint the potential issues. For example, accidentally ignoring the contribution of energy transfer due to mass flow can result in inability to balance energy equations or accurately predict system responses.

Therefore, recognising the vital role that the First Law of Thermodynamics plays in such disciplines can help us appreciate why the correct stating of this law for open systems is so crucial. By gaining a firm grasp of this fundamental principle, you pave the way towards successful application of thermodynamics in various real-world scenarios. It's not just about getting the statement right but also about understanding what it implies, its limitations, and its applications.

Impact of First Law of Thermodynamics on Open System

The First Law of Thermodynamics greatly influences how thermodynamic open systems behave and function. It provides a comprehensive framework to analyse multiple forms of energy exchanges and transformations which are an integral part of various engineering processes involving such open systems.

Analysing the Impact of the First Law of Thermodynamics

To truly appreciate the impact of the First Law of Thermodynamics on open systems, you must first fully understand what we mean by an open system. An open system is a system that allows the passage of both energy (in the form of heat and work) and mass across its boundaries. A teapot on a stove, a refrigerator, a steam turbine, or even the Earth itself, can be considered as open systems in different contexts.

When viewing things from the First Law's perspective, any kind of energy exchange or transformation process in an open system involves three major components: heat, work, and mass flow. While heat (\(\delta Q\)) and work (\(\delta W\)) being a part of this equation is quite common to closed systems as well, the twist in the story for open systems is the energy transfer associated with the mass flow (\(\delta E_{mass}\)). This unique component reflects the change in energy associated with the inflow and outflow of mass across the boundary of the system.

Therefore, the First Law for an open system effectively becomes a balance of these energy transfers, stated as:

\[ dU = \delta Q - \delta W - \delta E_{mass} \]

Bear in mind, the term 'energy' is a broad term, encompassing different forms. The internal energy 'U' at a particular state of a system includes all forms of energy present, including kinetic and potential energy of the molecules, electrical and magnetic energies, bond energies, and more. When we say the 'change in internal energy' (\(dU\)), it's essentially the difference in total energy of the system between two states.

The First Law allows us to see the exact amount and manner in which different forms of energy interact with each other in an open system. The implication is that we can predict and control the system behaviour to our advantage. By manipulating one or more of the parameters (heat, work, or mass flow), we can effectively engineer the response of the system. For instance, attaining the desired temperature in an AC system or optimal output power in a gas turbine, all are a direct outcome of clever application of the First Law in open systems. It's like pulling the right strings on a marionette puppet!

In a steam boiler, for example, the quantity of coal burnt (\(\delta E_{mass}\)) directly affects the quantity of heat supplied (\(\delta Q\)), which then governs the steam produced (\(dU\)). If the steam is used to do work (\(\delta W\)), such as in a steam engine, balancing these energies allows the engineer to optimise the process and improve efficiency.

Real-world Examples of the Law’s Impact on Open Systems

Every day, you encounter countless open systems operating around you, all being governed by the First Law of Thermodynamics. Junctions where heat, work, and mass interact and transform give us a practical manifestation of these laws.

Take, for instance, a refrigerator. It's a classic example of the First Law of Thermodynamics applied to an open system. The fridge extracts heat from the food inside (\(\delta Q\)) by performing work on the refrigerant (\(\delta W\)). The refrigerant flows in and out of the fridge (\(\delta E_{mass}\)), carrying with it the energy it absorbed during the evaporation process. All these energy transfers work together to decrease the internal energy of the food (\(dU\)), thus keeping it cool. This is an elegant demonstration of the First Law in play, resulting in the practical utility of preserving food at low temperatures.

Did you know? In a refrigerator, the compressor does work on the refrigerant to convert it to a high-pressure, high-temperature gas. This gas then flows into the condenser coils (usually at the back or underneath your refrigerator) and disperses heat to the surrounding, turning it into a high-pressure liquid. The high-pressure liquid then flows into the refrigerator, evaporates, and in doing so, absorbs heat from the items kept in the refrigerator. This entire process is a perfect embodiment of the First Law of Thermodynamics at work.

Another classic example of an open system where the First Law of Thermodynamics is fully at play is a car engine. When you turn the ignition key, you allow fuel and air to flow into the engine's cylinders (\(\delta E_{mass}\)). This fuel-air mixture burns and releases heat (\(\delta Q\)), which in turn pushes the pistons to do work (\(\delta W\)). This work then propels your car forward. This transformation of heat into work is also a vivid demonstration of how the First Law dictates the operation of open systems in real life!

Therefore, the underpinning role of the First Law in the functioning of these open systems is undeniable. It's evident in the simplest of gadgets at your home to the most sophisticated machinery in industries. This crucial fundamental law of physics strongly impacts how energy is manipulated, stored, transferred and converted in our daily lives and various scientific or industrial arenas.

Mechanism of First Law of Thermodynamics for Open System

The beauty of the First Law of Thermodynamics in open systems lies in its simple yet solid mechanism. It allows the analysis of engineering processes involving energy transfers and transformations in a more holistic and inclusive manner, accounting for mass flow alongside heat and work. But to truly grasp the essence of this law's mechanism for open systems, we must delve deeper.

Exploring the Mechanism of the First Law of Thermodynamics in Open Systems

Let's unravel the complexities of the behaviour of energy in open systems - a crucial point in the grand scheme of thermodynamics. The simple concept of energy neither being created nor destroyed, just transformed, serves as the foundation for the First Law of Thermodynamics.

In an open system, this law becomes a balance of heat, work, and mass flow. By carefully tailoring these variables, it's possible to drive the system to a desired outcome. This gives us the power to make thermodynamic predictions and engineer a calculated response.

Let's talk more in mathematical terms. Formally, the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system is represented by:

\[ dU = \delta Q - \delta W - \delta E_{mass} \]

This equation represents a balance of energy transfers and transformations within an open system. Each term plays a vital role:

  • \(\delta Q\) = infinitesimal amount of heat added to the system
  • \(\delta W\) = infinitesimal amount of work done by the system
  • \(\delta E_{mass}\) = energy associated with the mass flowing in and out of the system
  • \(dU\) = change in the internal energy of the system

The \(dU\) term stands for the minute change in the internal energy of the system. It's a comprehensive term that includes all types of energy contained in the system, such as kinetic and potential energies, bond energies, and more. By accounting for the changes in these forms of energy during processes, we attain a robust understanding of the system's behaviour.

However, the hidden gem in the equation is \(\delta E_{mass}\), being unique to open systems. This term encapsulates the energy associated with the mass flow. It's a subtle indicator of the inflow and outflow of mass across the boundary of the system. By incorporating this into the balance equation, the First Law ensures an inclusive analysis, hence capturing the true essence of energy interactions in an open system.

Practical Implications of the Law’s Mechanism in Real-world Scenarios

The mechanisms of First Law are not limited to textbooks or complex scientific calculations. They reflect in countless real-world scenarios in the form of practical engineering systems. Let’s examine how this intrinsically woven relationship between heat, work, and mass flow plays out in some common occurrences around us.

The mechanism of the First Law equips us with the ability to manipulate energy exchanges and transformations for our advantage. For instance, any air conditioning system works on this principle. It removes heat from one area (inside your house), thereby decreasing its internal energy, and dumps it to another area (outside your house), thereby increasing its internal energy. As a result, your house cools down, providing a comfortable living environment in harsh summers.

System Heat (\(\delta Q\)) Work (\(\delta W\)) Mass Flow (\(\delta E_{mass}\))
Air Conditioner Extracted from the room Done on the refrigerant by the compressor Refrigerant flowing across the system boundary
Car Engine Generated by burning fuel Done by the pistons to drive the car Fuel and air flowing into the cylinders

Another open system where the First Law of Thermodynamics operates in its full glory is a car engine. Fuel is burnt inside the engine's cylinders. This process generates a considerable amount of heat, which in turn does work on the pistons. These pistons then move to drive your car, effectively turning heat energy into kinetic energy. At the same time, the gas spent as a result of combustion flows out from the exhaust, marking the influence of mass flow in the energy balance.

These are just a few examples demonstrating the practical implications of the First Law's mechanism. It manifests itself across numerous applications - from mundane household appliances to complex industrial machinery. It's the guiding principle that allows engineers to innovate, design, and build systems that make our lives easier, productive, and comfortable.

First Law of Thermodynamics For Open System - Key takeaways

  • The First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System is given by the equation ΔECV = Qin, CV - Wout, CV + min, CVein, CV - mout, CVeout, CV
  • Derivation of First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System requires understanding of mass and energy transference between function and surrounding system.
  • For a steady-state system, ΔECV = 0, meaning the system is at equilibrium. Practical applications include improving the efficiency of turbines, boilers, and compressors in power generations.
  • The general equation for first law is δQ = dU + δW, which means the heat added to a system can increase its internal energy or perform work. When considering an open system, the adjusted general equation is δQ = dU + δW + δEmass
  • First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System states that the change in internal energy of a system is equal to the heat supplied to it minus the work done by the system and the energy transferred due to mass flow.

Frequently Asked Questions about First Law of Thermodynamics For Open System

The First Law of Thermodynamics in open systems is fundamental in engineering fields such as HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning), designing jet engines, steam turbines and internal combustion engines, where energy transfer occurs across system boundaries.

In an engineering context, the First Law of Thermodynamics for open systems accounts for mass flow in and out of the system, resulting in changes of internal energy. In contrast, the First Law for closed systems assumes no mass transfer, focusing only on heat and work interactions.

The main characteristic of the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system, from an engineering perspective, is the principle of energy conservation. This states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed but can be transferred from one form to another or from one place to another.

The First Law of Thermodynamics for open systems, which states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, underlines all engineering practices. It helps engineers to design systems for optimal energy usage - ensuring no energy is wasted, thereby conserving energy and improving efficiency.

The First Law of Thermodynamics for open systems impacts the design and operation of engineering systems by informing energy efficiency measures, optimising energy flows, minimising energy losses in input, transformation and output stages, and aiding in the design of sustainable energy systems.

Test your knowledge with multiple choice flashcards

What does the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system state and how is it mathematically represented?

What are the key principles underlying the First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System?

What does the equation representing the First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System signify?

Next

What does the First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system state and how is it mathematically represented?

The First Law of Thermodynamics for an open system states that the total energy entering a system equals the total energy leaving the system plus any change in the system's internal energy. It is represented as ΔEsystem = Qin - Wout + min.ein - mout.eout.

What are the key principles underlying the First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System?

The key principles include system boundaries, conservation of energy, and the concept of energy transfer by heat, work, and mass. There is also the interaction of energy between the open system and its surroundings.

What does the equation representing the First Law of Thermodynamics for an Open System signify?

The equation signifies how energy is transferred in an open system including heat transfer, work done, and mass flow. It represents how energy in various forms is transacted between the system and its environment.

How is the First Law of Thermodynamics applied to an open system?

The First Law of Thermodynamics is applied by accounting for the system boundary's permeability to mass flow. It is used to examine systems where mass inclusion is significant, such as turbines, boilers, and compressors.

What is the adjusted general equation for the First Law of Thermodynamics in an open system?

The adjusted general equation for an open system is \(\delta Q = dU + \delta W + \delta E_{mass}\), where \(\delta E_{mass}\) represents the change in energy associated with mass transfer. The equation portrays energy flow through heat transfer, the work done, and mass inflow or outflow.

What are the practical applications of the derivation of the First Law of Thermodynamics for open systems?

The derivation is applicable in various fields like chemical, mechanical engineering, material science, aeronautics. Examples include studying turbines, heat exchangers, reactor vessels, boilers, power cycles, air conditioning systems, where internal energy variations are crucial.

More about First Law of Thermodynamics For Open System

Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App

The first learning app that truly has everything you need to ace your exams in one place

  • Flashcards & Quizzes
  • AI Study Assistant
  • Study Planner
  • Mock-Exams
  • Smart Note-Taking
Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App

Sign up to highlight and take notes. It’s 100% free.

Entdecke Lernmaterial in der StudySmarter-App

Google Popup

Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App

Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App

The first learning app that truly has everything you need to ace your exams in one place

  • Flashcards & Quizzes
  • AI Study Assistant
  • Study Planner
  • Mock-Exams
  • Smart Note-Taking
Join over 22 million students in learning with our StudySmarter App